Page 219 of 244 FirstFirst ... 119169209217218219220221229 ... LastLast
Results 10,901 to 10,950 of 12168

Thread: Post EU - The Way Forward

  1. #10901

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Rothschild and Soros HQ
    Posts
    18,167
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    The gammon contingent is a bit quiet today. Post Office day? Or are they busy tooling up?

  2. #10902

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    16,914

    Default

    TBF, if May gets her deal through - a deal which no one really wants - she's payed a blinder. Hats off to her.

    Greatest peacetime leader since Thatcher.

  3. #10903

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bilderberg/MI5 jobshare
    Posts
    6,261

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
    That’s because Cox isn’t there to present proposals on alternative arrangements. He’s presenting legal text that if accepted will enable him to adjust his legal advise over the chances of remaining in the back stop permanently. James Forsyth said so on yesterday’s Spectator podcast. Still, what does he know. He’s just the bloke Theresa May said is the most informed journalist on cabinet leaks, rather than a bloke who posts on a football forum.
    The alternative arrangements have to be written into a 'codicil', which is a legal document. That's why the EU were expecting the pompous ass to turn up with a formula for doing it. Instead he just turned up and stared moodily at the ceiling.

    James Forsyth is by some distance NOT the most informed inside-track journalist on Cabinet deliberations. He's not even a proper reporting journalist, but part of the commentariat. The most informed journalist, by a country mile, is Tim Shipman. His contacts inside the Cabinet have leaked vast quantities of stuff exclusively to him, enough to fill dozens of exclusives for the Sunday Times and two very large books.

    So my advice, Lord Crap: don't take the word of a prime minister on who her idea of 'best' is in journalism. Apart from anything else, it's a spectacularly Uriah Heap, ever-so-'umble, way of thinking.

  4. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Verbal View Post
    The alternative arrangements have to be written into a 'codicil', which is a legal document. That's why the EU were expecting the pompous ass to turn up with a formula for doing it. Instead he just turned up and stared moodily at the ceiling.
    What a load of pony. “ Stared moodily at the ceiling”. Lol you got that from Shipmans twitter feed in Dec.

    He’s not over there to seek or propose alternative arrangements to replace the backstop. He’s over there to try and get something on the permanence of it. Forsyth, who despite what you say, has got the inside track, claimed that he arrived with legal texts of various options (sunset clause etc) and that this was the first time in the whole process that the UK were proposing, rather than reacting to legal text. Do you really believe an eminent lawyer and legal mind like Cox’s just sat there staring at the ceiling. Brexit has puddled your brain man.

    Forsyth is all over the cabinet meeting again today already,no wonder May states they don’t use What’s App but Forsyth App.








    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  5. Default

    The betrayal is complete:

    Quote Originally Posted by David Cameron
    And ultimately it will be the judgement of the British people in the referendum that I promised and that I will deliver. You will have to judge what is best for you and your family, for your children and grandchildren, for our country, for our future. It will be your decision whether to remain in the EU on the basis of the reforms we secure, or whether we leave. Your decision. Nobody else’s. Not politicians’. Not Parliament’s. Not lobby groups’. Not mine. Just you. You, the British people, will decide. At that moment, you will hold this country’s destiny in your hands. This is a huge decision for our country, perhaps the biggest we will make in our lifetimes. And it will be the final decision. So to those who suggest that a decision in the referendum to leave… …would merely produce another stronger renegotiation and then a second referendum in which Britain would stay… …I say think again. The renegotiation is happening right now. And the referendum that follows will be a once in a generation choice. An in or out referendum. When the British people speak, their voice will be respected – not ignored. If we vote to leave, then we will leave.

    There will not be another renegotiation and another referendum.

  6. #10906

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    The betrayal is complete:
    You'll get over it.

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    The betrayal is complete:
    "Hello, is that Garrotte World, north Hampshire's leading one-stop shop for all your strangulation needs?"

    "It is"

    "Can i check your bulk-buy rates, I might need to up my order of piano wire"

  8. #10908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    The betrayal is complete:
    So the previous PM, whilst heading up the previous government, made a promise that he can't deliver (due to not being PM anymore)? Oh what a completely new state of affairs this is.

  9. #10909

    Default

    So then, a couple of hundred people under consultation at the company I'm at, announced this morning, due to an organisational re-structure due to tough trading conditions over the last year and the uncertainty of Brexit upcoming.

    I'm sure it's not Brexit's fault though...

  10. Default

    Stick this in your pipe and smoke it:

    The world’s largest sovereign wealth fund has said it will expand its investment in Britain as it claimed confidence in the country remains undiminished by Brexit. In a move cheered by Brexiteers, Norway’s £740bn wealth fund has confirmed that it will plough billions of pounds of additional investment in the UK over the next three decades. The Norwegian fund, which is one of the country’s biggest foreign investors, said that the current uncertainty over Brexit had not altered its view of the UK. In a statement, its chief executive, Yngve Slyngstad, said the fund would “continue to be significant investors in Britain” and “ we foresee that over time our investments in the UK will increase.”

  11. #10911

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    Stick this in your pipe and smoke it:
    So, billions of pounds, so shall we assume £10b? Otherwise they'd have said 10's of billions. So, £10b over 30 years, approx £300m per year.

    That will cover 2/3rds of the cost of sorting our potholes every year then - SCORE!

  12. #10912

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Rothschild and Soros HQ
    Posts
    18,167
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    Stick this in your pipe and smoke it:
    Morning John.

    Changing tack after your latest flop on here - remember you had a meltdown because I claimed that the Parliament would block or force May to take no deal off the table. You know when you've been tangoed pal

  13. #10913

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Rothschild and Soros HQ
    Posts
    18,167
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unbelievable Jeff View Post
    So, billions of pounds, so shall we assume £10b? Otherwise they'd have said 10's of billions. So, £10b over 30 years, approx £300m per year.

    That will cover 2/3rds of the cost of sorting our potholes every year then - SCORE!
    They largely invest in large cap equities and bonds with only a bit in property and infrastructure. Of course, most of the UK's largest listed companies e.g. HSBC and BP are basically global entitites with pretty limited exposure to the UK economy.

  14. #10914

    Default

    Not sure if this has been posted yet but here's the government study published about the implications of a no deal

    https://assets.publishing.service.g....March_2019.pdf

    Some takeaways for those who can't be arsed to go through it all (haven't added any opinion just summarised).

    1. Paragraph one, according to this document no deal doesn't have any mandate as a result of the referendum.
    2. Paragraph three outlines a siginificant (sic) impact on business, trade and the economy.
    3. Paragraph six outlines that the government is preparing for as much "continuity" as possible in a no deal scenario including unilateral action, whether reciprocated or not by the EU.
    4. Paragraph six also outlines how EU hauliers with be favoured (in the immediate aftermath) over UK hauliers.
    5. Paragraph eight highlights that almost a third of the most critical projects (to accommodate a no deal) are behind schedule.
    6. Paragraph nine shows that to date (of publish of the document) the government has spent £4bn of the public purse on Brexit planning.
    7. Paragraph fourteen outlines that any continuity of business is at the mercy of the EU, and that it's unlikely that the EU27 will support such a thing (even if we are within the confines of WTO law).
    8. Paragraph 12 outlines that agreements will "clearly not be in place" with a number of countries that amount to 11% of our current trade.
    9. Paragraph 19 alludes to potential loss of citizen's rights, at least in the short term.
    10. Paragraph 17 talks about the fact that UK are not prepared for the outcomes of a no deal scenario, including passport renewals, driving licences renewals, car insurance in relation to travel within Europe.
    11. Paragraph 21 outlines that the UK economy will be 6-9% smaller in the event of a no deal brexit, with a "significant difference between regions" (Wales -8.1%, Scotland -8.0%, Northern Ireland -9.1% and the North East of England -10.5%)
    11. Paragraph 25 outlines the cross border impact on goods, including taxation and slow down in crossing goods over the borders.
    12. Paragraph 26 explicitly states that businesses with supply chains will have additional costs and burdens (sic).
    13. Paragraph 29 outlines our reliance on the EU for food (30% of our food comes from there)
    14. Paragraph 32 outlines what potential tariffs on goods could look like "EU would introduce tariffs of around 70% on beef and 45% on lamb exports, and 10% on finished automotive vehicles" and how it's impossible to predict how businesses would cope with this.
    15. Paragraph 35 says that no deal would have severe impact on NI and last longer than the UK
    16. Paragraph 39 outlines the impact on the service industry (80% of our economy) and highlights the difficulty we'll have in employing trained staff from the EU.
    17. Paragraph 51 basically says that the government are not prepared for a no deal scenario and cannot mitigate the damage that it'll do to the UK.

    All in all it makes pretty grim reading, and i'm sure there's things in there that'll speak more directly to areas other people here are interested in.

  15. #10915

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    They largely invest in large cap equities and bonds with only a bit in property and infrastructure. Of course, most of the UK's largest listed companies e.g. HSBC and BP are basically global entitites with pretty limited exposure to the UK economy.
    Their investments will be purchasing undervalued UK companies due to our weak exchange rate.

    Vultures picking at the carcass.

  16. #10916

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ericb View Post
    Not sure if this has been posted yet but here's the government study published about the implications of a no deal

    https://assets.publishing.service.g....March_2019.pdf

    Some takeaways for those who can't be arsed to go through it all (haven't added any opinion just summarised).

    1. Paragraph one, according to this document no deal doesn't have any mandate as a result of the referendum.
    2. Paragraph three outlines a siginificant (sic) impact on business, trade and the economy.
    3. Paragraph six outlines that the government is preparing for as much "continuity" as possible in a no deal scenario including unilateral action, whether reciprocated or not by the EU.
    4. Paragraph six also outlines how EU hauliers with be favoured (in the immediate aftermath) over UK hauliers.
    5. Paragraph eight highlights that almost a third of the most critical projects (to accommodate a no deal) are behind schedule.
    6. Paragraph nine shows that to date (of publish of the document) the government has spent £4bn of the public purse on Brexit planning.
    7. Paragraph fourteen outlines that any continuity of business is at the mercy of the EU, and that it's unlikely that the EU27 will support such a thing (even if we are within the confines of WTO law).
    8. Paragraph 12 outlines that agreements will "clearly not be in place" with a number of countries that amount to 11% of our current trade.
    9. Paragraph 19 alludes to potential loss of citizen's rights, at least in the short term.
    10. Paragraph 17 talks about the fact that UK are not prepared for the outcomes of a no deal scenario, including passport renewals, driving licences renewals, car insurance in relation to travel within Europe.
    11. Paragraph 21 outlines that the UK economy will be 6-9% smaller in the event of a no deal brexit, with a "significant difference between regions" (Wales -8.1%, Scotland -8.0%, Northern Ireland -9.1% and the North East of England -10.5%)
    11. Paragraph 25 outlines the cross border impact on goods, including taxation and slow down in crossing goods over the borders.
    12. Paragraph 26 explicitly states that businesses with supply chains will have additional costs and burdens (sic).
    13. Paragraph 29 outlines our reliance on the EU for food (30% of our food comes from there)
    14. Paragraph 32 outlines what potential tariffs on goods could look like "EU would introduce tariffs of around 70% on beef and 45% on lamb exports, and 10% on finished automotive vehicles" and how it's impossible to predict how businesses would cope with this.
    15. Paragraph 35 says that no deal would have severe impact on NI and last longer than the UK
    16. Paragraph 39 outlines the impact on the service industry (80% of our economy) and highlights the difficulty we'll have in employing trained staff from the EU.
    17. Paragraph 51 basically says that the government are not prepared for a no deal scenario and cannot mitigate the damage that it'll do to the UK.

    All in all it makes pretty grim reading, and i'm sure there's things in there that'll speak more directly to areas other people here are interested in.
    ... but ...but.... " we got our country back" by voting to leave.

    The fact that the country is horribly damaged by the vote doesn't seem to matter.

  17. #10917

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Rothschild and Soros HQ
    Posts
    18,167
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ericb View Post
    Not sure if this has been posted yet but here's the government study published about the implications of a no deal

    https://assets.publishing.service.g....March_2019.pdf

    Some takeaways for those who can't be arsed to go through it all (haven't added any opinion just summarised).

    1. Paragraph one, according to this document no deal doesn't have any mandate as a result of the referendum.
    2. Paragraph three outlines a siginificant (sic) impact on business, trade and the economy.
    3. Paragraph six outlines that the government is preparing for as much "continuity" as possible in a no deal scenario including unilateral action, whether reciprocated or not by the EU.
    4. Paragraph six also outlines how EU hauliers with be favoured (in the immediate aftermath) over UK hauliers.
    5. Paragraph eight highlights that almost a third of the most critical projects (to accommodate a no deal) are behind schedule.
    6. Paragraph nine shows that to date (of publish of the document) the government has spent £4bn of the public purse on Brexit planning.
    7. Paragraph fourteen outlines that any continuity of business is at the mercy of the EU, and that it's unlikely that the EU27 will support such a thing (even if we are within the confines of WTO law).
    8. Paragraph 12 outlines that agreements will "clearly not be in place" with a number of countries that amount to 11% of our current trade.
    9. Paragraph 19 alludes to potential loss of citizen's rights, at least in the short term.
    10. Paragraph 17 talks about the fact that UK are not prepared for the outcomes of a no deal scenario, including passport renewals, driving licences renewals, car insurance in relation to travel within Europe.
    11. Paragraph 21 outlines that the UK economy will be 6-9% smaller in the event of a no deal brexit, with a "significant difference between regions" (Wales -8.1%, Scotland -8.0%, Northern Ireland -9.1% and the North East of England -10.5%)
    11. Paragraph 25 outlines the cross border impact on goods, including taxation and slow down in crossing goods over the borders.
    12. Paragraph 26 explicitly states that businesses with supply chains will have additional costs and burdens (sic).
    13. Paragraph 29 outlines our reliance on the EU for food (30% of our food comes from there)
    14. Paragraph 32 outlines what potential tariffs on goods could look like "EU would introduce tariffs of around 70% on beef and 45% on lamb exports, and 10% on finished automotive vehicles" and how it's impossible to predict how businesses would cope with this.
    15. Paragraph 35 says that no deal would have severe impact on NI and last longer than the UK
    16. Paragraph 39 outlines the impact on the service industry (80% of our economy) and highlights the difficulty we'll have in employing trained staff from the EU.
    17. Paragraph 51 basically says that the government are not prepared for a no deal scenario and cannot mitigate the damage that it'll do to the UK.

    All in all it makes pretty grim reading, and i'm sure there's things in there that'll speak more directly to areas other people here are interested in.
    The document is also absolutely scathing of the snake oil salesmen and halfwits (hello John) who've been peddling the idea that GATT Article XXIV is some kind of secret weapon.

  18. #10918

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    22 Acacia Avenue
    Posts
    11,051

    Default

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47400679

    "Net migration to the UK from countries outside the European Union has hit its highest level for 15 years, the Office for National Statistics says."

    Not sure how "regaining control of our borders" will solve this.

  19. #10919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47400679

    "Net migration to the UK from countries outside the European Union has hit its highest level for 15 years, the Office for National Statistics says."

    Not sure how "regaining control of our borders" will solve this.
    And they'll be mostly brown people - the Brexiteers nightmare.

  20. #10920

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    16,914

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47400679

    "Net migration to the UK from countries outside the European Union has hit its highest level for 15 years, the Office for National Statistics says."

    Not sure how "regaining control of our borders" will solve this.
    Keep the grints out!

  21. Default

    I love the Beeb, reporting on the Norway investment:

    Norway's giant state investment fund has said it will increase its investment in the UK. The sovereign wealth fund, which has $1tn (£750bn) to invest from Norway's oil and gas income, is already one of the biggest investors in UK assets. Its chief executive has said that it will continue to be a "significant" investor in the UK, despite Brexit.

  22. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unbelievable Jeff View Post
    And they'll be mostly brown people - the Brexiteers nightmare.
    Pony.

    Most Brexiters just want brown people treated the same as Europeans.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  23. #10923

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Rothschild and Soros HQ
    Posts
    18,167
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
    Pony.

    Most Brexiters just want brown people treated the same as Europeans.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Of course they do pal and Jack Stephens is better than Harry Maguire

    Here in the real world...

    https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandp...re-most-about/

    #brownpeople
    Last edited by shurlock; 28-02-2019 at 01:29 PM.

  24. #10924

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    Of course they do pal and Jack Stephens is better than Harry Maguire

    Here in the real world...

    https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandp...re-most-about/

    #brownpeople
    How ironic for those who voted out to reduce immigration that net non EU migration to Sept 2018 has increased to >250,000

    #becarefulwhatyouwishfor

  25. #10925

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Bath
    Posts
    1,300

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
    Pony.

    Most Brexiters just want brown people treated the same as Europeans.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    That is the most Pony like statement in the history of this thread.

  26. #10926

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    I love the Beeb, reporting on the Norway investment:
    Yes I mean how dare the BBC actually report the words that the chief executive of Norges Investment Bank actually used. How dare the Norwegians not believe in the Brexit unicorns.

    You really are a prize chump …. and apparently you cannot retaliate to what I write as you have me on ignore . You are like the nutter sticking his fingers in his ears,shouting "la la la" at the top of his voice to ignore reality..

  27. #10927

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Hidden behind enemy lines
    Posts
    10,717

    Default

    Jeff, you weren't wrong. This place is nuts.

  28. #10928

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post
    Jeff, you weren't wrong. This place is nuts.
    I honestly think it's best you turn around, forget what you've seen, and never return. Nothing good can come of it.

  29. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highfield Saint View Post
    How ironic for those who voted out to reduce immigration that net non EU migration to Sept 2018 has increased to >250,000

    #becarefulwhatyouwishfor
    If the people are unhappy with the number of Non EU migrants arriving, they can kick the Government out.

    What redress have they if they’re unhappy with the numbers arriving from the EU?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  30. #10930

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
    If the people are unhappy with the number of Non EU migrants arriving, they can kick the Government out.

    What redress have they if they’re unhappy with the numbers arriving from the EU?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Kick the government out for not using the 3 month rule to control them.

  31. #10931

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sunny Shirley
    Posts
    1,900

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highfield Saint View Post
    How ironic for those who voted out to reduce immigration that net non EU migration to Sept 2018 has increased to >250,000

    #becarefulwhatyouwishfor
    Even more ironic in that Theresa May was charge of immigration in her years as Home Secretary and this was where she had the power to bring the numbers down, but she did absolutely nothing.

  32. #10932

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ecuk268 View Post
    Even more ironic in that Theresa May was charge of immigration in her years as Home Secretary and this was where she had the power to bring the numbers down, but she did absolutely nothing.
    The first thing she did was to cancel the ID card scheme.

  33. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unbelievable Jeff View Post
    Kick the government out for not using the 3 month rule to control them.
    You can’t kick people out that are in work. Therefore, if you believe there are too many EU nationals working in this country, who do you kick out. Drunker, Tusk, Barnier maybe?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  34. #10934

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
    You can’t kick people out that are in work. Therefore, if you believe there are too many EU nationals working in this country, who do you kick out. Drunker, Tusk, Barnier maybe?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Those in full time, official employment aren't the issue though, it's those working cash in hand at car washes, on building sites, picking fruit, living 15 in a 2 bed mid terrace that are the main issues, certainly for the Brexiteers I've spoken to.

  35. #10935

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    16,914

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
    Pony.

    Most Brexiters just want brown people treated the same as Europeans.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    #brownrightsmatter

  36. #10936

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Rothschild and Soros HQ
    Posts
    18,167
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Another Brexiter claim increasingly exposed as fantasy. Who ever thought that America First meant anything other than America First. Hope JJ, Les, LD and the other swivels have got their lube ready.

    US takes tough line with UK on post-Brexit trade talks

    The Trump administration has taken an aggressive posture towards the UK on post-Brexit trade talks, demanding greater access to the UK market for its agricultural products and guarantees that London would not manipulate its currency.

    The office of the US trade representative, led by Robert Lighthizer, on Thursday released its “negotiating objectives” for a possible trade agreement with the UK, suggesting Britain is unlikely to get softer treatment than other US allies.*

    In the 18-page document, Mr Lighthizer’s office said it was seeking “comprehensive market access for US agricultural goods in the UK” through the reduction or elimination of tariffs, a request that has already soured Washington’s trade relations with the EU.*

    Furthermore, the US is looking for the UK to remove “unwarranted barriers” related to “sanitary and physiosanitary” standards in the farm industry. For years US agricultural groups have complained that European countries have unnecessarily limited American exports of meat and grains based on fears they are unsafe for consumers.*

    Access to the British agricultural market could end up being the most politically sensitive request made by the Trump administration. The EU has said it was not willing to include agriculture in its own trade negotiations with the US, given that it could trigger a big public backlash in a wide range of member states.*

    Other demands could also be highly problematic for London. On currency, the US wants to “ensure that the UK avoids manipulating exchange rates in order to prevent effective balance of payments adjustment or to gain an unfair competitive advantage”. Currency matters have traditionally been excluded from trade negotiations, but the Trump administration has injected them into talks, including with China and Japan.

    Another provision that could raise eyebrows would constrain the UK’s ability to secure a trade deal with a “non-market economy” — such as China — by creating a “mechanism to ensure transparency and take appropriate action”. This could allow the US to ditch its trade deal with the UK if it does not like the terms of any agreement London strikes with Beijing.

    The tough US demands are only an opening gambit, but they highlight the difficulties the UK could face in negotiating a trade deal with Washington, in contrast to claims made by leading Brexit proponents that it would be a smooth exercise.

    On Thursday a UK government spokesperson said negotiating an “ambitious free trade agreement” with the US was a priority and Washington’s move to publish its objectives “demonstrates their commitment to beginning talks as soon as possible”.

    She added: “As part of our open and transparent approach to negotiations, we will publish our own negotiating objectives in due course.”

    The US negotiating objectives for the UK deal are similar to the wish lists published in recent months by Mr Lighthizer’s office for talks with the EU and Japan.

    On industrial goods, the US said it was aiming for “comprehensive duty-free access” and stronger “disciplines to address non-tariff barriers” from the UK.

    In digital trade, which is rapidly expanding, the US wants “secure commitments not to impose customs duties on digital products”, such as software, music, video and ebooks, and “non-discriminatory treatment” of content.

    In commercial partnerships, the US is asking the UK to “discourage politically motivated actions to boycott, divest from, and sanction Israel”.
    https://www.ft.com/content/09bfe7ca-...b-2c7f526ca5d0

  37. Default

    Non, je ne regrette rien:


  38. #10938

    Default

    "Furthermore, the US is looking for the UK to remove “unwarranted barriers” related to “sanitary and physiosanitary” standards in the farm industry. For years US agricultural groups have complained that European countries have unnecessarily limited American exports of meat and grains based on fears they are unsafe for consumers."

    This is the bit that worries me about any US deal.

  39. #10939

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Rothschild and Soros HQ
    Posts
    18,167
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unbelievable Jeff View Post
    "Furthermore, the US is looking for the UK to remove “unwarranted barriers” related to “sanitary and physiosanitary” standards in the farm industry. For years US agricultural groups have complained that European countries have unnecessarily limited American exports of meat and grains based on fears they are unsafe for consumers."

    This is the bit that worries me about any US deal.
    And watch the UK get nowhere on promoting trade and exports in professional services.

  40. #10940

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Cusp of a wave
    Posts
    18,593

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    Non, je ne regrette rien:



    Dingbat

  41. #10941

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    22 Acacia Avenue
    Posts
    11,051

    Default

    You have to wonder why GM bothers.

  42. #10942

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    22 Acacia Avenue
    Posts
    11,051

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    Another Brexiter claim increasingly exposed as fantasy. Who ever thought that America First meant anything other than America First. Hope JJ, Les, LD and the other swivels have got their lube ready.


    https://www.ft.com/content/09bfe7ca-...b-2c7f526ca5d0

  43. #10943

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    22 Acacia Avenue
    Posts
    11,051

    Default

    https://www.politicshome.com/news/uk...ing-businesses

    "TV advertisements urging businesses and the public to prepare for a no-deal Brexit are to be aired ahead of the UK's exit from the EU, the head of Britain's civil service has said."

  44. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by buctootim View Post


    Dingbat
    Thanks for proving that being in the eurozone is pointless...

  45. #10945

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Cusp of a wave
    Posts
    18,593

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    Thanks for proving that being in the eurozone is pointless...
    Hahaha. What it proves is that your supposed point about industrial production declining because of the end of QE in the eurozone is nonsense.

  46. #10946

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    You have to wonder why GM bothers.
    He seems to post things he finds on Brexiteer websites, without thinking about what the graphs, statements etc mean, as most of the things he posts negatively impact the point he's trying to make. It was very common on the other side I used to frequent as well.

    It's very odd, but very funny
    Last edited by Unbelievable Jeff; 01-03-2019 at 02:03 PM.

  47. #10947

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sunny Shirley
    Posts
    1,900

    Default

    I see that the Government has had to pay Eurotunnel £33m due to "failing" Grayling's handling of the Brexit ferry fiasco.

    I know that the below website is meant to be satirical, but it does strike a chord:

    https://newsthump.com/2019/03/01/gov...th-no-lawyers/

    After today's damming report of the botched part privatisation of the Probation Service which cost us £500m and resulted in the contracts being terminated 14 months early, is there any Minister in recent memory more incompetent than Grayling.

    I believe that he was at University with the PM so maybe he has some compromising information about her. How else can he keep his job?

  48. #10948

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    22 Acacia Avenue
    Posts
    11,051

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ecuk268 View Post

    After today's damming report of the botched part privatisation of the Probation Service which cost us £500m and resulted in the contracts being terminated 14 months early, is there any Minister in recent memory more incompetent than Grayling.
    According to the Guardian report, part of the money paid as 'bailouts' to the companies running the privatised service was given to enable them to pay the fines imposed on them by the MoJ for failing to meet their 'payment by results' targets.

  49. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ecuk268 View Post
    I believe that he was at University with the PM so maybe he has some compromising information about her. How else can he keep his job?
    I think the information that she is a useless negotiator with the charisma of a wet tea towel
    may be an open secret, now...

  50. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ecuk268 View Post
    I see that the Government has had to pay Eurotunnel £33m due to "failing" Grayling's handling of the Brexit ferry fiasco.

    I know that the below website is meant to be satirical, but it does strike a chord:

    https://newsthump.com/2019/03/01/gov...th-no-lawyers/

    After today's damming report of the botched part privatisation of the Probation Service which cost us £500m and resulted in the contracts being terminated 14 months early, is there any Minister in recent memory more incompetent than Grayling.

    I believe that he was at University with the PM so maybe he has some compromising information about her. How else can he keep his job?
    Grayling sums up the level of farce and incompetence. These cnts can’t sort anything let alone something as complex as Brexit.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •