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Saint in Paradise
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I have flown with Virgin many times on that route, over deepest Russia can get a bit bumpy, but the worst I have experienced was when leaving Hong Kong and you go from sub tropical air to colder dryer desert air as you head north, and that set off 3 hours of continual bumps, not pleasant!

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I have flown with Virgin many times on that route, over deepest Russia can get a bit bumpy, but the worst I have experienced was when leaving Hong Kong and you go from sub tropical air to colder dryer desert air as you head north, and that set off 3 hours of continual bumps, not pleasant!

 

Can sympathise with that. Apaprently there was a bad 10 minutes on our flight out in 2001. However, I was so blotto that I fell asleep and missed it all and only found out later!

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Thank you to those with serious replies, I am a very very bad passenger when it's rough. I now know to take

plenty of sleeping pills :D

I always used to get nervous when it got bumpy but now it doesn't seem to bother me. Sit as far forward in the plane as you can and I always used to think of those brave chaps in their Lancasters over Germany. At least you're not being shot at!

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Completely depends on the weather conditions at the time. A tropical cyclone in the region of East Asia can lead to several hours of turbulence. The other main causes are thunderstorms (which tend to be more seasonal) and mountain waves, which are dependant on the prevailing wind conditions and the stability of the atmosphere.

 

Then there is also the jet stream. A narrow core of air moving extremely quickly at high altitude, up to 250mph hour at times. This gives turbulence, mainly beneath it and on the cold air side. As it happens there is currently a jet stream over the North Atlantic, passing directly over iceland...

 

I always used to get nervous when it got bumpy but now it doesn't seem to bother me. Sit as far forward in the plane as you can and I always used to think of those brave chaps in their Lancasters over Germany. At least you're not being shot at!

 

Generally the best place to be is over the wings. Over the centre of gravity there tends to be much less movement than at the far ends of the cabin.

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Funny you say that - did NZ a few months back and although flew eastbond to Bangkok (Hong Kong on way home) we had what i'd call fairly bad turbulence over the Afghan mountains - I was thinking to myself "is there a worse place in the world to come down right now?"

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Funny you say that - did NZ a few months back and although flew eastbond to Bangkok (Hong Kong on way home) we had what i'd call fairly bad turbulence over the Afghan mountains - I was thinking to myself "is there a worse place in the world to come down right now?"

 

You'd almost certainly be dead so I'm not sure it matters.

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You'd almost certainly be dead so I'm not sure it matters.

 

It's a fair point, although to bring an aircraft down you would need to fly through the core of a violent thunderstorm or into the rotor zone of a mountain lee wave.

 

People are killed fairly regularly by turbulence, but in most cases it's through not wearing their seat belts and the aircraft is absolutely fine.

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Its not that bad... Been doing it twice a year with virgin in recent years. Over russia you can get a little but nothing too taxing. Depends what you define as bad!

 

I'd like to take this post out of context with hilarious consequences.

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Completely depends on the weather conditions at the time. A tropical cyclone in the region of East Asia can lead to several hours of turbulence. The other main causes are thunderstorms (which tend to be more seasonal) and mountain waves, which are dependant on the prevailing wind conditions and the stability of the atmosphere.

 

Then there is also the jet stream. A narrow core of air moving extremely quickly at high altitude, up to 250mph hour at times. This gives turbulence, mainly beneath it and on the cold air side. As it happens there is currently a jet stream over the North Atlantic, passing directly over iceland...

 

 

 

Generally the best place to be is over the wings. Over the centre of gravity there tends to be much less movement than at the far ends of the cabin.

 

Yeah that is because the rest of the plane flexes up and down so if you are sitting at the back you can see the middle of the plane go up while you are going down

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I was on a cathay flight on sunday night from Sydney to HK.... before take off the pilot said it will be a smooth climb and a smooth flight until we hit the equator which due to the change in pressure and air temp it will be a bit bouncy.

 

1 hour in to the flight, the plane was being thrown all over the show and the seat belt signs remained on for 2 hours or so.... they were taken off and food was served then they were put right back on again for a couple of hours due to more turbulence.....

 

Never heard a peep from the captain..... I think he must have thought why did I open my mouth! :)

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