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What a brilliant outcome


benjii
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I shed a tear when Mrs Thatcher left downing street. It's been a long time but now we have leader that can carry on from where she left off. Let's get Britain back on it's feet and build a country we can be proud of again.

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Did you live through the 80s and early 90s - the loss of our manufacturing industry, the widening of the poverty gap, the massive increase in the jobless, the poor and the abandoned!

 

Even a decade of Labour government failed to do more than scratch the surface of the damage Thatchet and the Tories did to this country!

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Good luck Slick Dave, give this country the walloping it needs.

 

Good luck Nice Nick, keep the weird ones in check.

 

Brilliant outcome.

 

Benjii, I always had you pegged as a weirdo hippy Marxist but obviously I was wrong!

 

I echo your sentiments:

 

Thank God We Now Have A Conservative-Led Government And The Bloody Socialists Are OUT OF POWER!!!!

 

P O W E R T O C A M E R O N!

 

A new dawn!!!!

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Benjii, I always had you pegged as a weirdo hippy Marxist but obviously I was wrong!

 

:lol:

 

I am something of a libertarian IMO. In some cases this leads me towards the Tories, in some the LibDems, but rarely towards the control-freak, short-sighted, philo-phobic Labour.

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philo-phobic? que?

 

I just made it up. It means "someone who fears wisdom". The opposite of philosophy, which means, literally "love of wisdom/knowledge".

 

You have my permission to use it (although I can't rule out making yourself look a prat if you do).

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I just made it up. It means "someone who fears wisdom". The opposite of philosophy, which means, literally "love of wisdom/knowledge".

 

You have my permission to use it (although I can't rule out making yourself look a prat if you do).

 

Ah, ta - got it. Might come in handy one day - Im not averse to looking a prat on special occasions.

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Good luck Slick Dave, give this country the walloping it needs.

 

Good luck Nice Nick, keep the weird ones in check.

 

Brilliant outcome.

 

great result a hung parliment and now we have a majority government in power for a change and refreshing ideas:D coming out .

it looks like cameron seems to have a strong liberal streak and vision.

hopefully they will lose all the old nutty tories to ukip.

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Benjii, I always had you pegged as a weirdo hippy Marxist but obviously I was wrong!

 

I echo your sentiments:

 

Thank God We Now Have A Conservative-Led Government And The Bloody Socialists Are OUT OF POWER!!!!

 

P O W E R T O C A M E R O N!

 

A new dawn!!!!

unlike blairs tories .
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I'm beginning to feel a bit optimistic that in this time of economic crisis, steps have been taken to form a bond between two rival parties in the hope that together they can better serve the national interest. There seems to have been a bit of give and take from both sides, some compromise is often a good thing. The Lib/Dems have gained a disproportionate amount of power and influence compared to the number of MPs they have, but undoubtedly they have a reasonable support base in terms of votes cast for them. Naturally both parties are suspicious of the other and at grass roots level, many of them detest each other. But because it appears that the Lib/Dems will have seats around the Cabinet table, they might get to develop a mutual respect for each other debating the issues and policies calmly and in an adult manner, rather than baying at each other in the bear pit that is the House of Commons. I'm almost more comforted by the alliance than if the Conservatives had to go it alone as a minority party and I didn't think that I would have thought that way a month ago.

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At least these new socialists should cost us a lot less.

 

funnily enough, the one Lib-dem policy I strongly support is the tax threshold being raised to £10,000. Now that seams like it is going to happen as part of the coalition deal. I will be about £800 a year better off as a result. (21% of about £4,000). Top notch, but begs the question why Labour - supposedly the party of the poor - didn't do it? Remember the 10p tax scandal? You see, Labour like to spend the poor's money for them. The Tories (and Liberals) will let us spend our own.

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funnily enough, the one Lib-dem policy I strongly support is the tax threshold being raised to £10,000. Now that seams like it is going to happen as part of the coalition deal. I will be about £800 a year better off as a result. (21% of about £4,000). Top notch, but begs the question why Labour - supposedly the party of the poor - didn't do it? Remember the 10p tax scandal? You see, Labour like to spend the poor's money for them. The Tories (and Liberals) will let us spend our own.[/QUOTE]

 

 

On buying healthcare and education because they don't want to provide it to us for free.

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I'm beginning to feel a bit optimistic that in this time of economic crisis, steps have been taken to form a bond between two rival parties in the hope that together they can better serve the national interest. There seems to have been a bit of give and take from both sides, some compromise is often a good thing. The Lib/Dems have gained a disproportionate amount of power and influence compared to the number of MPs they have, but undoubtedly they have a reasonable support base in terms of votes cast for them. Naturally both parties are suspicious of the other and at grass roots level, many of them detest each other. But because it appears that the Lib/Dems will have seats around the Cabinet table, they might get to develop a mutual respect for each other debating the issues and policies calmly and in an adult manner, rather than baying at each other in the bear pit that is the House of Commons. I'm almost more comforted by the alliance than if the Conservatives had to go it alone as a minority party and I didn't think that I would have thought that way a month ago.

 

see i think your coming round to my way of thinking;)

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I'm beginning to feel a bit optimistic that in this time of economic crisis, steps have been taken to form a bond between two rival parties in the hope that together they can better serve the national interest. There seems to have been a bit of give and take from both sides, some compromise is often a good thing. The Lib/Dems have gained a disproportionate amount of power and influence compared to the number of MPs they have, but undoubtedly they have a reasonable support base in terms of votes cast for them. Naturally both parties are suspicious of the other and at grass roots level, many of them detest each other. But because it appears that the Lib/Dems will have seats around the Cabinet table, they might get to develop a mutual respect for each other debating the issues and policies calmly and in an adult manner, rather than baying at each other in the bear pit that is the House of Commons. I'm almost more comforted by the alliance than if the Conservatives had to go it alone as a minority party and I didn't think that I would have thought that way a month ago.

 

I am coming round to this. I actually now think it will be a good thing and 1 week ago I was predicting armagedon with a hung paliament. I prefer the current scenario to a Labour majority (so I will have to take back what I have said previously)

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I am coming round to this. I actually now think it will be a good thing and 1 week ago I was predicting armagedon with a hung paliament. I prefer the current scenario to a Labour majority (so I will have to take back what I have said previously)

So, how long do you give it?

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So, how long do you give it?

 

Who knows?

 

There are some key areas where there will be flashpoints (Europe, Immigration and Electoral Reform) even if they appear to have appeased each other.

 

However, I think on taxation and the economy there is concensus.

 

So for the big issue of the day, the economy, things will be alright in the short term. If things progress economically over the next 1-2 years, then the other issues will probably come in to play.

 

Therefore, I give it 1-2 years.

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Did you live through the 80s and early 90s - the loss of our manufacturing industry, the widening of the poverty gap, the massive increase in the jobless, the poor and the abandoned!

 

Even a decade of Labour government failed to do more than scratch the surface of the damage Thatchet and the Tories did to this country!

 

The manufacuring industry was always going to be screwed with the emergance of growing industrial countries suchs as India and China etc. The cost of manufacturing in the UK against those UK & EU companies manufacturing in places such as India was never going to be competitive or sustainable. The alternative would have been for the tax payers to prop up the UK manufacturing industry, which is ludicrous and a short step away from extreme socialism.

 

Thatcher only facilitated the inevitable.

 

Any critic of Thatcher only have to look at her record in the polls. If she was that bad why didn't the public vote her out.....ever? It's not like she was slick & dynamic and full of spin, therefore she must have been there on her policy credentials.

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It is impossible to gauge. It all depends on whether the two parties can bury their differences and act for what they both perceive to be the common good. It could be a few months, or a few years.

 

I reckon there'll be a honeymoon period until after the summer recess.

 

Then I think there might be some problems.

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It is impossible to gauge. It all depends on whether the two parties can bury their differences and act for what they both perceive to be the common good. It could be a few months, or a few years.

 

Under the new fixed term parliament, apparently the only way to have an election earlier is if 55% of MPs support a motion of no confidence. Conservatives have around 47% of the MP's.

Edited by Scummer
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