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This business of players going on strike


Huffton
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This is obviously hypothetical as I can't ever really seeing it happening, but if a player went on strike to try and force a move, surely he would be in breach of contract and the club could play proper hard ball and refuse to pay him for withholding his services?

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The right to strike has been in place in the UK since the Industrial Revolution. It was an essential development for the protection of workers in industries such as the cotton trade where the workplace would be very hot due to the poor ventilation and presence of steam engines. Machinery was not fenced off and workers were exposed to moving machine parts. Children were often employed to move between these dangerous machines as they were small enough to fit between tightly packed plant, which led to high mortality rates in factories. Added to the dangers of the workplace employees were required to work long hours in this inhospitable environment, typically exceeding 12 hours per day and for very meagre wages.

 

The right to strike is also essential for the protection of millionaire footballers who would prefer to earn more money.

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Wasn't it "refusal to play" rather than an all out strike though? Very different situations. You'd presume he'd want to train to keep fit/in shape to make himself attractive to other teams, which wouldn't be striking.

 

Also it would belittle what many people have fought years to have the right to do ... mind you, this is the guy who thought his presence would make some poor children have a better life after visiting ... !

 

Mind you, his "refusal to play", didn't he do that in the last few matches of the season anyway??

 

Additionally, the guy's a d!ck.

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Well you wouldn't have to pay them. An interesting thought though is whether the club could recover the cost of the transfer that they paid for them. So in Lovren's case he has 3 years left on a 4 year deal so in theory we could recover £6m from him personally. (like Chelsea did to Kezman)

 

Unfortunately economics comes into play - as much as I would love to shaft one of these players, you would almost certainly be foregoing a large transfer fee. No club is going to do that.

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Wasn't it "refusal to play" rather than an all out strike though? Very different situations.

 

If a bus driver "refuses to drive" the bus then it isn't going to get very far....

 

(I've no idea if that analogy works or has any relevance....the thought just popped into my head and I typed it into a post on here. I like to live life on the edge)

Edited by trousers
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Also worth noting that it's quite easy to say "I'll never play for the club again" while two days into a two-week holiday before returning to pre-season training. I do wonder what would have happened if we'd played hardball with him. Ultimately, once we get to a training/game situation where he then refuses to work, then he's in breach of contract and all those lovely "loyalty" (LOL) bonuses he wanted to ensure he kept by not submitting a written transfer request suddenly disappear from view.

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This is obviously hypothetical as I can't ever really seeing it happening, but if a player went on strike to try and force a move, surely he would be in breach of contract and the club could play proper hard ball and refuse to pay him for withholding his services?

 

They could, but what would be the benefit?

 

Whatever the club do, they will be losing the player. They have the choice of losing him at market value by selling him, losing him for nothing after he sits out his contract or losing him at whatever a tribunal award them for breach of contract by the player (much less than market value).

 

The only real choice the club has is to sell the player. Once again, money is the cause of the issue.

 

Of course the player's image may be affected, but if they are threatening to strike they evidently don't care too much about their image.

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Player goes on strike, what options do you have.

 

1) To acquiesce to his demands

 

2) You may want to take the moral high ground but you would be cutting your nose off to spite your face. Pride before a fall and all that etc etc. If you are referring to the two players whose name has cropped up with the word refuse/strike, sure, they could have been put on gardening leave but who does that benefit?

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The right to strike has been in place in the UK since the Industrial Revolution. It was an essential development for the protection of workers in industries such as the cotton trade where the workplace would be very hot due to the poor ventilation and presence of steam engines. Machinery was not fenced off and workers were exposed to moving machine parts. Children were often employed to move between these dangerous machines as they were small enough to fit between tightly packed plant, which led to high mortality rates in factories. Added to the dangers of the workplace employees were required to work long hours in this inhospitable environment, typically exceeding 12 hours per day and for very meagre wages.

 

The right to strike is also essential for the protection of millionaire footballers who would prefer to earn more money.

 

Sorry Bearsy. There is NO right to strike in the UK. Only through collective agreements is a workforce permitted to withdraw their labour once ALL procedures are exhausted.Employers can still raise an injunction against a Union for 'Actions in constraint of trade' and usually win. I taught labour Law for over thirty years.

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Also worth noting that it's quite easy to say "I'll never play for the club again" while two days into a two-week holiday before returning to pre-season training. I do wonder what would have happened if we'd played hardball with him. Ultimately, once we get to a training/game situation where he then refuses to work, then he's in breach of contract and all those lovely "loyalty" (LOL) bonuses he wanted to ensure he kept by not submitting a written transfer request suddenly disappear from view.

 

Legally Steve,the Club can play the 'Frustration of Contract' card and refuse to pay any player who doesn't want to play. It's patently obvious to me that the Club wanted him out and took the easy option.

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Interesting is that Kenwyne Jones, the last Saints player involved in strike action was also a client of the Stellar Group. I am certain his agent would have prompted Lallana to come out with the "I'll never play for Saints ago.

 

For myself of more interest is how the club has overlooked the tapping up of our players by other clubs via the media. Surely we would have course for taking action as no where have I seen that we gave permission to speak with anyone beside Rickie.

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For myself of more interest is how the club has overlooked the tapping up of our players by other clubs via the media. Surely we would have course for taking action as no where have I seen that we gave permission to speak with anyone beside Rickie.

 

No one gave Poch permission to talk to Spurs but he had dinner with Levy through a "mutual friend" where shop was talked, all before the last game of the season.

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Legally Steve,the Club can play the 'Frustration of Contract' card and refuse to pay any player who doesn't want to play. It's patently obvious to me that the Club wanted him out and took the easy option.

 

However, 'frustration of contract' will ultimately end in 'rescinding of contract'. Once that happens the player can go to whoever wants him as he will be a 'free agent' without a contract.

 

The smart play is still to cash in and get £25m for someone who doesn't want to be at the club and hope that he enjoys his three games of champions league football - watching from the bench!

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They don't go on strike or they wouldn't get paid. They just have a run of niggling little injuries that can't be identified.

 

But would be unfit or unavailable for international selection, wonder how that would have changed the equation. Either way I think we were right to move him on and move on ourselves.

 

Best of luck getting the ball from Sturridge and Sterling part of England's problem not the solution.

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