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Jose Fonte's Leg


dubai_phil
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No seriously!

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-2557867/Ive-Hull-Saints-defender-Jose-Fonte-shows-battle-scars-scoring-match-winner.html

 

article-0-1B6E442B00000578-65_306x423.jpg

 

Southampton defender Jose Fonte's efforts in securing a 1-0 victory over Hull on Tuesday night came at a cost that's been revealed by a picture the Portuguese posted on Instagram.

Fonte scored the game's only goal with a scrambled effort to bring Saints within a point of virtually assuring their Premier League survival under Mauricio Pochettino, in what has not been a season without incident.

 

However, it seems the 30-year-old was left licking his wounds at the end of the game after posting a picture showing off his battle scars from what appears to be the team bus.

 

Fonte's left leg is seen raked with three still bleeding gashes and was accompanied by the caption: 'Fair to say I need some proper shin pads!! #carbon'.

Edited by dubai_phil
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I don't understand the gash (lol) that goes towards his sock, my cheap **** shinpads protect me in that area pretty toight. I'm sure a pro with $$$$$$$ can afford better ones than me...

 

what are you suggesting, that fonte is a cutter? I think ur wrong cos cutters do not tend to post pictures of cuts on instagrams.

 

Here is some more info on cutting, so we can watch out for warning signs:

 

Cutting has a contagious element and therefore spreads in stressful environments that contain greater numbers of vulnerable subjects. Eager to please, overly stressed teen girls are at risk. Many girls share that they are sickened yet fascinated when they first hear of cutting. From there, the information is stored on a shelf in their consciousness. It is an option.

 

Depending on factors including stress level, stress sensitivity, emotional development, emotional support and overall lifestyle health and balance, a teen girl either will or won’t explore cutting herself.

 

Cutting is a coping mechanismm which means it is a way to regulate feelings. Unfortunately, it “works” in that teens report it makes them feel better. They like that they can control it, keep it secret, see and feel a “result," and express emotions people don’t seem to like, especially anger and sadness. To make things worse, the brain wires quickly for this behavior, creating a stress + cutting = relief circuit that becomes harder and harder to break over time. Ideally, teens employ healthier coping strategies when under stress. For example, a stressed teen might exercise, talk with friends, take a nap, have a good cry, or write in a journal to relieve stress. Instead, cutting and other low ranking coping strategies are hastily adopted because our teens have no time, support, or creativity to develop better coping mechanisms.

 

It’s important to think of cutting as a symptom, which means it is secondary to a core problem. The core problem is that fewer teens have an opportunity to experience full and healthy development in a reasonably (not overwhelmingly) challenging environment. Externally, our teens are under too much pressure. Internally, our teens lack sufficient emotional development to help them cope with it. External stressors are numerous, varied and interrelated. Teen girls today experience much more stress than what was common in their parents’ generation. Much more than boys, girls put themselves under extraordinary pressure to be super smart, super attractive, and super well-liked (preferably adored) by everyone. Not an easy list to master.

 

Additional heavy hitting stressors: getting into “a good” college, not letting people down, looking attractive, looking stylish, being thin, being really, really good at everything, keeping up with commitments, keeping up with expectations, and lastly: surviving it all to get a good job so they can work even more...for the rest of their lives. The combination of way too much stress and too little time for healthy development drives the cutting epidemic. Cultivating good, solid, healthy coping behaviors requires time, support from others, and a new way of thinking about authentic and sustainable success.

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what are you suggesting, that fonte is a cutter? I think ur wrong cos cutters do not tend to post pictures of cuts on instagrams.

 

Here is some more info on cutting, so we can watch out for warning signs:

 

Cutting has a contagious element and therefore spreads in stressful environments that contain greater numbers of vulnerable subjects. Eager to please, overly stressed teen girls are at risk. Many girls share that they are sickened yet fascinated when they first hear of cutting. From there, the information is stored on a shelf in their consciousness. It is an option.

 

Depending on factors including stress level, stress sensitivity, emotional development, emotional support and overall lifestyle health and balance, a teen girl either will or won’t explore cutting herself.

 

Cutting is a coping mechanismm which means it is a way to regulate feelings. Unfortunately, it “works” in that teens report it makes them feel better. They like that they can control it, keep it secret, see and feel a “result," and express emotions people don’t seem to like, especially anger and sadness. To make things worse, the brain wires quickly for this behavior, creating a stress + cutting = relief circuit that becomes harder and harder to break over time. Ideally, teens employ healthier coping strategies when under stress. For example, a stressed teen might exercise, talk with friends, take a nap, have a good cry, or write in a journal to relieve stress. Instead, cutting and other low ranking coping strategies are hastily adopted because our teens have no time, support, or creativity to develop better coping mechanisms.

 

It’s important to think of cutting as a symptom, which means it is secondary to a core problem. The core problem is that fewer teens have an opportunity to experience full and healthy development in a reasonably (not overwhelmingly) challenging environment. Externally, our teens are under too much pressure. Internally, our teens lack sufficient emotional development to help them cope with it. External stressors are numerous, varied and interrelated. Teen girls today experience much more stress than what was common in their parents’ generation. Much more than boys, girls put themselves under extraordinary pressure to be super smart, super attractive, and super well-liked (preferably adored) by everyone. Not an easy list to master.

 

Additional heavy hitting stressors: getting into “a good” college, not letting people down, looking attractive, looking stylish, being thin, being really, really good at everything, keeping up with commitments, keeping up with expectations, and lastly: surviving it all to get a good job so they can work even more...for the rest of their lives. The combination of way too much stress and too little time for healthy development drives the cutting epidemic. Cultivating good, solid, healthy coping behaviors requires time, support from others, and a new way of thinking about authentic and sustainable success.

 

The self-harm society welcomed me with open arms.

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