View Poll Results: Saints Web Definitely Not Official Second Referendum

Voters
158. You may not vote on this poll
  • Leave Before - Leave Now

    35 22.15%
  • Leave Before - Remain Now

    8 5.06%
  • Leave Before - Not Bothered Now

    2 1.27%
  • Remain Before - Remain Now

    88 55.70%
  • Remain Before - Leave Now

    6 3.80%
  • Remain Before - Not Bothered Now

    0 0%
  • Not Bothered Before - Leave Now

    3 1.90%
  • Not Bothered Before - Remain Now

    4 2.53%
  • I've never been bothered - Why am I on this Thread?

    2 1.27%
  • No second Ref - 2016 was Definitive and Binding

    10 6.33%
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Thread: Brexit - Enter at Your Own Risk

  1. #15601

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    Or per his MO, he slinks off and doesn't respond because he's made a factual howler.
    No, hands up, other countries held referenda on whether to accept treaties, then overturned the original decision. My train of thought was that the EU being used to others reversing their decision, that they would expect us to do the same.

  2. #15602

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    If he does it will be several paragraphs longer than it should be ... with several spelling errors.
    But I didn't make a spelling mistake. I used a commonplace alternative spelling, just as that Politico article did. Apart from the one spelling that you questioned, were there several other spelling mistakes in those last several paragraphs? Perhaps you will be good enough to list them all, if you wish to uphold your position as the number one forum small-minded pedant.

  3. #15603

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    If he does it will be several paragraphs longer than it should be ... with several spelling errors.
    But I didn't make a spelling mistake. I used a commonplace alternative spelling, just as that Politico article did. Apart from the one spelling that you questioned, were there several other spelling mistakes in those last several paragraphs? Perhaps you will be good enough to list them all, if you wish to uphold your position as the number one forum small-minded pedant.

  4. #15604

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    No, hands up, other countries held referenda on whether to accept treaties, then overturned the original decision. My train of thought was that the EU being used to others reversing their decision, that they would expect us to do the same.
    You said they voted to leave the EU which is completely and utterly different.

  5. #15605

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    You said they voted to leave the EU which is completely and utterly different.
    Perhaps it was just a spelling mistake.

  6. #15606

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    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    Perhaps it was just a spelling mistake.
    If it was he will not admit it.

    I forget. Which day of the week is it that Les doesn't do? Is it Fridays by chance?

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    A Washington based conservative think tank, the Heritage Foundation, published a paper on the best option for the UK, should we leave the EU, focusing on free trade deals. To me, this is the most important thing to get right. (" It's all about the economy, stupid"). In summary, the report states:


    1. The U.S. and the U.K. should negotiate a free trade area based on the principles of national sovereignty and economic freedom.
    2. For both nations, the barrier to this goal is the European Union. Britain cannot negotiate unless it leaves the EU, while the U.S. has wrongly supported the EU over the sovereignty of its member nations.
    3. The U.S. policy of using Britain as its Trojan Horse in the EU is wrong in principle and doomed to failure in practice.
    4. The U.K. must ensure that its referendum on EU membership offers a real choice. There is no reason why the U.K., the world’s sixth-largest economy, cannot negotiate trade arrangements outside the EU.
    5. The benefits of an Anglo–American free trade area would be both economic and political. It would insulate the U.K. from the damaging effects of further EU regulatory interference and signal the two countries’ shared political commitment to their close relationship


    For those interested, the full text is here and I found it exciting and stimulating. Onwards and upwards!

    PS. For any miners out there, ignore the name of the centre publishing the paper....
    So, the thread has taken it's course and despite the ill informed, dogmatic and undemocratic ranting from the leftist trolls, over the next few weeks my prescient opening post made nearly 4 years ago, will come to pass:
    Boris Johnson is expected to formally open trade talks with the US before he begins discussions with the European Union, the Telegraph has learned. US diplomats believe the Prime Minister is poised to seek Cabinet authorisation to open trade talks directly with America on a visit to Washington next month.
    British civil servants have drawn up advice for ministers on the “pros and cons” of starting trade talks with America before beginning them with the European Union, the Telegraph understands. A UK government source who has seen the advice said the argument for going to the US first is to show: “We mean business and we’re not messing around.” It would also aim to avoid becoming “trapped” by Brussels negotiators like Theresa May was, and “negate some of the concerns of the EU trying to play the ball in the way they want”, the source said. “The political signal would be - 'We’ve got the capacity to do this at the same time, don’t hold this up'.”
    A source briefed directly on plans in Washington said the US was “impatient to get started”.
    I must admit, at the time of the original post, I overestimated the intellect of the liberal establishment and underestimated their disdain for the democratic will of the people. Thankfully they have been vanquished at an election and silenced, apart from the occasional desperate whining this post will inevitably engender.
    Last edited by Guided Missile; 18-01-2020 at 04:59 AM.

  8. #15608

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    Wow. What prescience John. The UK and US will finally open trade talks. Who would have thought that the UK would want to use Brexit to strike trade deals with countries outside the EU? Literally nobody saw that one coming.

    Next you’ll be claiming sole credit for predicting that the night follows the day. Black holes are brighter than you pal.
    Last edited by shurlock; 18-01-2020 at 06:04 AM.

  9. #15609

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    If it was he will not admit it.

    I forget. Which day of the week is it that Les doesn't do? Is it Fridays by chance?
    Surely that should be 'perchance' rather than 'by chance' to be grammatically correct

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    Wow. What prescience John. The UK and US will finally open trade talks. Who would have thought that the UK would want to use Brexit to strike trade deals with countries outside the EU? Literally nobody saw that one coming.
    You didn't see it coming, troll boy...
    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock
    2525-06-2016, 07:31 PM This is not to say that the UK is not an important trading partner. Far from it. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.
    Today's Telegraph?
    A source briefed directly on plans in Washington said the US was “impatient to get started”. The Telegraph understands all the “chapter heads” covering individual sections for a trade deal have already been appointed and “matched” with their American counterparts in preparation for an accelerated process. Under the timeframe being discussed by both sides, the Cabinet decision will be followed by the publication of UK trade negotiation objectives within two weeks, which the US side will take two weeks to respond to ahead of a political launch. “There is so much political will on both sides for this, the understanding is that the first talks round will come very rapidly after the two-week review period, which could mean as early [to] late February,” said the source.
    Like shooting fish in a barrel...

  11. #15611

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    You didn't see it coming, troll boy...

    Today's Telegraph?

    Like shooting fish in a barrel...
    If you’ve been following the news over the past couple of years, trade talks with China have been the overwhelming priority for the administration. And they still are. Not to mention renegotiating NAFTA and going into a protectionist frenzy (which I anticipated). Opening talks with the UK and embarking on preliminaries (even appointing chapter heads - gee whiz) doesn’t require a huge amount of effort or commitment. You really are an easy touch. I would love to have negotiated with you in business pal.
    Last edited by shurlock; 18-01-2020 at 07:06 AM.

  12. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    If you’ve been following the news over the past couple of years, trade talks with China have been the overwhelming priority for the administration. And they still are. Opening talks with the UK and embarking on preliminaries doesn’t require a huge amount of effort or commitment. You really are an easy touch. I would love to have negotiated with you pal.
    1. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.
    2. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.
    3. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.

  13. #15613

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    1. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.
    2. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.
    3. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.
    Yes Trump the protectionist (called it pal) has ditched multilateralism and prospective multilateral trade arrangements and replaced them with a host of bilateral, individual-country negotiations. A simple matter of substitution. The point is exactly the same: his priorities have laid elsewhere, not with the UK. But hey they’ve now appointed some chapter heads - I’m sure an accelerated comprehensive FTA is just around the corner
    Last edited by shurlock; 18-01-2020 at 07:38 AM.

  14. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    1. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.
    2. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.
    3. But TTIP, TTP as well as global initiatives on services are massive ambitious projects that any new president will inherit and are unlikely to be set aside to prioritise a deal with the UK.
    Yeah, that's right....let's flash back two years to Tuesday 24 January 2017, and 6 months after you made that prediction, chump:
    “A great thing for the American worker what we just did,” said Donald Trump as, with the stroke of his pen, he cancelled the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TTP). Trump will also scrap the European equivalent, Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), which has only just been agreed, and renegotiate (i.e. dismantle) the North American Free Trade Area (Nafta). Candidate Trump described it as the “worst deal ever” – a proud product of the presidencies of Bill Clinton and the first President Bush.
    Keep digging, troll boy...

  15. #15615

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    If it was he will not admit it.

    I forget. Which day of the week is it that Les doesn't do? Is it Fridays by chance?
    As Weston points out, you don't do grammar, do you? I seem to recall another occasion when you attempted to nitpick on somebody's grammar and then made a howler yourself a couple of posts later. I'm waiting for the list of other spelling mistakes that you inferred I made in that post, in order to justify your assertion that I commonly commit spelling errors.

  16. #15616

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    Yeah, that's right....let's flash back two years to Tuesday 24 January 2017, and 6 months after you made that prediction, chump:

    Keep digging, troll boy...
    Six months before that, Trump wasn’t even in power. Indeed the outcome of presidential election was still up in the air. As it turned out, the UK wasn’t the priority for the US in the intervening three years. And yes a protectionist is in the White House. By contrast, I lost count of the number of posts in which you giddily seized on every snippet of news to claim a la David Davis that an agreement with the US was being negotiated and details hammered out so it would be locked and loaded, if not ready to come into force once the UK left the EU. Instead fast forward to 2020 and where are we? The UK and US have only just appointed chapter heads. Some prioritisation. You were spectacularly wrong.

    Let’s also be clear: when you posted in Jan 2017, Trump had either done the things in your post (I.e. cancel TPP) or categorically stated he would do them (i.e. renegotiate NAFTA). A prediction isn’t simply to describe and restate what’s already going on, chump

    While I struggle to find much evidence on here, I’m sure you’re good at some things John. But prediction really isn’t one of them.
    Last edited by shurlock; 18-01-2020 at 09:21 AM.

  17. #15617

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    As Weston points out, you don't do grammar, do you? I seem to recall another occasion when you attempted to nitpick on somebody's grammar and then made a howler yourself a couple of posts later. I'm waiting for the list of other spelling mistakes that you inferred I made in that post, in order to justify your assertion that I commonly commit spelling errors.
    Still waiting for you to clarify which countries voted to leave the EU?

  18. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    Let’s also be clear: when you posted in Jan 2017, Trump had either done the things in your post (I.e. cancel TPP) or categorically stated he would do them (i.e. renegotiate NAFTA).
    Let's also be clear, I started the thread in June, 2016. Trump was elected on November 9, 2016. You continued to make yourself look like a fool on January 18th, 2020.

  19. #15619

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    Still waiting for you to clarify which countries voted to leave the EU?
    Are you deliberately trying to play the fool this morning? I already admitted that I had made a mistake. Greenland arguably, although it was part of Denmark and it left the EEC rather than the EU.

  20. #15620

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    As Weston points out, you don't do grammar, do you? I seem to recall another occasion when you attempted to nitpick on somebody's grammar and then made a howler yourself a couple of posts later. I'm waiting for the list of other spelling mistakes that you inferred I made in that post, in order to justify your assertion that I commonly commit spelling errors.
    You just don't get it do you??

    You have posted umpteen times on this thread. Your posts are tedious, repetitive and humourless. When put under pressure you disappear from this thread for a couple of weeks before reappearing with the same views. You can never admit to being wrong about anything... even spelling. Of course you don't make loads of spelling mistakes but just admit to one when you do. Don't argue that black is white like you did yesterday.

    In other words, lighten up pal. Open your mind to the possibility, unlikely to you I am sure, that you do not have a monopoly of knowledge.

  21. #15621

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    Let's also be clear, I started the thread in June, 2016. Trump was elected on November 9, 2016. You continued to make yourself look like a fool on January 18th, 2020.
    Nope pal: your post about scrapping TPP and renegotiating NAFTA was made on Tuesday 24 January 2017 -namely after these things had happened (TPP) or Trump had already vowed to make them happen (NAFTA). So much for your prediction. What next? Are you going to come back tomorrow and post today’s lottery numbers
    Last edited by shurlock; 18-01-2020 at 10:55 AM.

  22. #15622

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    Are you deliberately trying to play the fool this morning? I already admitted that I had made a mistake. Greenland arguably, although it was part of Denmark and it left the EEC rather than the EU.
    Fair enough. The admission was so bum-clenchingly oblique and tight-fisted (just your style) that I couldn’t tell.

    We move on.

  23. Default Things that make you go hmm...

    Airbus then...
    “Airbus,” he warned, “is not dependent on the UK for our future. Please don’t listen to the Brexiteers’ madness which asserts that because we have huge plants here, we will not move and we will always be here. They are wrong.”Airbus – which employs 13,500 directly in the UK and supports almost eight times as many jobs in its supply chain – represents a massive chunk of Britain’s £36bn a year aerospace sector. Enders described the industry as “standing on a precipice, with Brexit threatening to destroy a century of development based on education, research and human capital”.
    Airbus now...
    Faury, who succeeded Enders in April, said the company was “committed to the UK and committed to working with the new government to be a key partner to an ambitious industrial strategy”. Faury added he saw “great potential to improve and expand our operations in the UK this year... Watch this space”.

  24. #15624

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    You just don't get it do you??

    You have posted umpteen times on this thread. Your posts are tedious, repetitive and humourless. When put under pressure you disappear from this thread for a couple of weeks before reappearing with the same views. You can never admit to being wrong about anything... even spelling. Of course you don't make loads of spelling mistakes but just admit to one when you do. Don't argue that black is white like you did yesterday.

    In other words, lighten up pal. Open your mind to the possibility, unlikely to you I am sure, that you do not have a monopoly of knowledge.
    So, my posts are tedious, repetitive and humourless? Can I make a simple suggestion? Put me on ignore.
    If I disappear for a week or two, it is often because. I am often away on business. You might find it surprising, but I do have a life outside of this forum. Sometimes it might be because several of you remoaners gang up and post petty and infantile insults, so I allow you the time to talk among yourselves, knowing how frustrating that must be for you.
    Thank you for contradicting your earlier post by admitting that I do not in fact make loads of spelling mistakes. Don't attempt to use sarcasm if it is plainly nonsensical and baseless. A word to the wise; don't accuse others of spelling mistakes and then make grammatical errors yourself. Learn the difference between an actual spelling error and the use of an accepted alternative spelling which was illustrated by it's usage in a media article I provided.
    I have never claimed to have a monopoly of knowledge. You are the tediously, small-minded, nit-picking pedant here, and you use it as a strategy attempting to belittle those with whom you disagree. It isn't a good look, pal.
    For some reason, you resent me posting several times on a thread about Brexit when it is something I have wanted to occur over several years. If that annoys you, then tough. Happily, we will be out in a fortnight. Suck it up.

  25. #15625

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    So, my posts are tedious, repetitive and humourless? Can I make a simple suggestion? Put me on ignore.
    If I disappear for a week or two, it is often because. I am often away on business. You might find it surprising, but I do have a life outside of this forum. Sometimes it might be because several of you remoaners gang up and post petty and infantile insults, so I allow you the time to talk among yourselves, knowing how frustrating that must be for you.
    Thank you for contradicting your earlier post by admitting that I do not in fact make loads of spelling mistakes. Don't attempt to use sarcasm if it is plainly nonsensical and baseless. A word to the wise; don't accuse others of spelling mistakes and then make grammatical errors yourself. Learn the difference between an actual spelling error and the use of an accepted alternative spelling which was illustrated by it's usage in a media article I provided.
    I have never claimed to have a monopoly of knowledge. You are the tediously, small-minded, nit-picking pedant here, and you use it as a strategy attempting to belittle those with whom you disagree. It isn't a good look, pal.
    For some reason, you resent me posting several times on a thread about Brexit when it is something I have wanted to occur over several years. If that annoys you, then tough. Happily, we will be out in a fortnight. Suck it up.
    As I said - long winded, repetitive and lacking in humour.

  26. #15626

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    As I said - long winded, repetitive and lacking in humour.
    As I said, put me on ignore, loser.

  27. #15627

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    As I said, put me on ignore, loser.
    Remarkably concise for you but not only humourless but graceless.

  28. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    Remarkably concise for you but not only humourless but graceless.
    Repetitive use of the word "but"...

  29. #15629

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    Repetitive use of the word "but"...
    Blimey! I am off ignore. GM is developing a backbone and is prepared to read views different from his own. Is a new GM on the horizon?

  30. #15630

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    Good news in the past few days about our intentions post-Brexit from 1st February. Sajid Javid stating that the UK planned to diverge from EU rules has caused alarm bells to ring in Brussels, particularly from Merkel. What a refreshing change Javid is to Spreadsheet Phil Hammond. Thank God that the likes of him are no longer in Government.

    Typically, the French are making noises about how the trade deal cannot be negotiated until the question of EU fisheries access to our coastal waters has been resolved. Time to tell them to go and get lost, that it will not be used as a bargaining chip in trade negotiations.

    https://brexitcentral.com/the-fishin...oastal-waters/

    Also it is very encouraging to hear that we will be actively negotiating trade deals with the rest of the World simultaneously with those with the EU. That should keep them on their toes and let them know that we are no longer the patsies we were under the terminally useless May and Robbins.

  31. #15631

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    So, my posts are tedious, repetitive and humourless? Can I make a simple suggestion? Put me on ignore.
    If I disappear for a week or two, it is often because. I am often away on business. You might find it surprising, but I do have a life outside of this forum. Sometimes it might be because several of you remoaners gang up and post petty and infantile insults, so I allow you the time to talk among yourselves, knowing how frustrating that must be for you.
    Thank you for contradicting your earlier post by admitting that I do not in fact make loads of spelling mistakes. Don't attempt to use sarcasm if it is plainly nonsensical and baseless. A word to the wise; don't accuse others of spelling mistakes and then make grammatical errors yourself. Learn the difference between an actual spelling error and the use of an accepted alternative spelling which was illustrated by it's usage in a media article I provided.
    I have never claimed to have a monopoly of knowledge. You are the tediously, small-minded, nit-picking pedant here, and you use it as a strategy attempting to belittle those with whom you disagree. It isn't a good look, pal.
    For some reason, you resent me posting several times on a thread about Brexit when it is something I have wanted to occur over several years. If that annoys you, then tough. Happily, we will be out in a fortnight. Suck it up.
    Away on business? Whatever next? My pet dog taking driving lessons?

  32. #15632

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    Good news in the past few days about our intentions post-Brexit from 1st February. Sajid Javid stating that the UK planned to diverge from EU rules has caused alarm bells to ring in Brussels, particularly from Merkel. What a refreshing change Javid is to Spreadsheet Phil Hammond. Thank God that the likes of him are no longer in Government.

    Typically, the French are making noises about how the trade deal cannot be negotiated until the question of EU fisheries access to our coastal waters has been resolved. Time to tell them to go and get lost, that it will not be used as a bargaining chip in trade negotiations.

    https://brexitcentral.com/the-fishin...oastal-waters/

    Also it is very encouraging to hear that we will be actively negotiating trade deals with the rest of the World simultaneously with those with the EU. That should keep them on their toes and let them know that we are no longer the patsies we were under the terminally useless May and Robbins.
    The cheap bluster might work for your eBay garden gnome business Les. But it’s fooling nobody in Europe and only succeeding in freaking out UK industry.

    #fûckbusiness
    Last edited by shurlock; 20-01-2020 at 11:38 AM.

  33. #15633

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    Good news in the past few days about our intentions post-Brexit from 1st February. Sajid Javid stating that the UK planned to diverge from EU rules has caused alarm bells to ring in Brussels, particularly from Merkel. What a refreshing change Javid is to Spreadsheet Phil Hammond. Thank God that the likes of him are no longer in Government.
    What about in the UK ?
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...n-EU-regs.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    In Les warped little world, it’s all project fear. Not to mention he and Saj know more about the needs of UK industry than the people running it.

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    Your counterparts in the EU also consider it cheap bluster, Gavyn, based on the incompetence of our negotiations under May and Robbins. Very soon, they are going to have to wake up to reality, that not only finally do we have people with a spine negotiating for us, but also that following Boris' stonking majority, we now have the whip hand in those negotiations. The EU is petrified that we will become a major competitor on their doorstep, so naturally they will try to hamstring us into not having a competitive advantage by diverging from any of their rules and regulations that we consider to be petty bureaucracy.

    I'm afraid that you have the cheap bluster fooling nobody the wrong way about, Gavyn. It's coming from the EU, telling us that there isn't time, this or that must be on the table, we cannot change or cancel any of their rules, etc. If there isn't enough time for a FTA by the end of December 2020, we are out without one on WTO. We are leaving the SM and the CU with divergence from their rules and regulations, therefore something like Canada + will be fine, or we will have made extensive preparations for no deal in these coming months.

    By "British business" being freaked out, you mean big business, multinational companies who benefited from the EU cartel and their bureaucracy that stifled competition from smaller businesses, rather than all British businesses. Of course, many UK businesses will thrive once we have left the EU. As for your cheap jibe that a negotiating stance is more effective applied to small businesses rather than it is to negotiations between nations, many of the principles and psychology are common to both, and I cannot believe that you would be so stupid as to not recognise that. In particular, we considerably weakened our negotiating hand by having our parliament vote into law that we could not accept no deal, thus inviting a bad deal. Of course, no business equally should negotiate on the basis that they are not prepared to walk away from a bad deal, whether they are selling garden gnomes, cars, or defence weaponry.

  36. #15636

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    Your counterparts in the EU also consider it cheap bluster, Gavyn, based on the incompetence of our negotiations under May and Robbins. Very soon, they are going to have to wake up to reality, that not only finally do we have people with a spine negotiating for us, but also that following Boris' stonking majority, we now have the whip hand in those negotiations. The EU is petrified that we will become a major competitor on their doorstep, so naturally they will try to hamstring us into not having a competitive advantage by diverging from any of their rules and regulations that we consider to be petty bureaucracy.

    I'm afraid that you have the cheap bluster fooling nobody the wrong way about, Gavyn. It's coming from the EU, telling us that there isn't time, this or that must be on the table, we cannot change or cancel any of their rules, etc. If there isn't enough time for a FTA by the end of December 2020, we are out without one on WTO. We are leaving the SM and the CU with divergence from their rules and regulations, therefore something like Canada + will be fine, or we will have made extensive preparations for no deal in these coming months.

    By "British business" being freaked out, you mean big business, multinational companies who benefited from the EU cartel and their bureaucracy that stifled competition from smaller businesses, rather than all British businesses. Of course, many UK businesses will thrive once we have left the EU. As for your cheap jibe that a negotiating stance is more effective applied to small businesses rather than it is to negotiations between nations, many of the principles and psychology are common to both, and I cannot believe that you would be so stupid as to not recognise that. In particular, we considerably weakened our negotiating hand by having our parliament vote into law that we could not accept no deal, thus inviting a bad deal. Of course, no business equally should negotiate on the basis that they are not prepared to walk away from a bad deal, whether they are selling garden gnomes, cars, or defence weaponry.
    Everything you said would come to pass in the last three years has failed to materialise; still I admire your dour persistence and pluckiness pal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    Everything you said would come to pass in the last three years has failed to materialise; still I admire your dour persistence and pluckiness pal.
    Because of the remoaner establishment doing their best to thwart Brexit these past three years, the electorate gave the two fingers vertical salute to them and voted for Boris and the pro-Brexit Tory party, giving them the stonking majority they needed to finally get it done. That majority means that there is absolutely nothing that you remoaners can now do to prevent it, although I appreciate that you will continue to bleat on about what a bad dream it has all been for you.

    As I've said many times before, I've waited for this since 1992, so I'm not bothered about three years, especially because as the result of that delay it brought about the massive increase in the pro-Brexit strength of the Tory Party government.

  38. #15638

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    Because of the remoaner establishment doing their best to thwart Brexit these past three years, the electorate gave the two fingers vertical salute to them and voted for Boris and the pro-Brexit Tory party, giving them the stonking majority they needed to finally get it done. That majority means that there is absolutely nothing that you remoaners can now do to prevent it, although I appreciate that you will continue to bleat on about what a bad dream it has all been for you.

    As I've said many times before, I've waited for this since 1992, so I'm not bothered about three years, especially because as the result of that delay it brought about the massive increase in the pro-Brexit strength of the Tory Party government.
    Get it done by erecting a border in our own country just to safeguard the EU’s single market. That’s very generous of us You’re prepared to swallow anything provided it’s not your own pride. What happened to the UK holding all the cards, being able to dictate terms and secure the benefits of membership without the obligations and the negotiations being a cakewalk? You and your deluded sense of entitlement and exceptionalism have been made to look foolish over the past three years and the real fun and games haven’t even started yet.
    Last edited by shurlock; 20-01-2020 at 01:40 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    the real fun and games haven’t even started yet.
    I know, I can't wait. May and Robbins, Bercow, Benn, Letwin, Hammond, Gauke, Soubry and other remoaners made the whole country look foolish. They're all history, jobless or neutered now, so onwards and upwards, eh, Gavyn?

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    Fun and games:
    The UK economy will outpace the struggling eurozone in the first two years after Brexit, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has predicted for the first time. Britain also outpaced the monetary union in 2019, giving it three straight years of faster growth, according to the IMF's latest forecasts. The fund slashed growth across the eurozone, warning that a weaker German recovery and a slowdown in Spain will weigh on the region’s economy this year.
    Shortages of food and medicine, crops rotting in the fields, no Romanian gypsies left to wash posh folks cars, empty supermarkets, pets interned in Calais, stockpiling, prepping, John Cleese emigrating. So that was all just b0ll0x after all. And to think there were idiots that fell for it.

  41. #15641

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    Fun and games 2:
    More than 1000 banks, asset managers, payments firms and insurers from the European Union are planning to open offices in post-Brexit Britain so they can continue to serve UK clients. The new offices would help financial firms counter the loss of business as unrestricted two-way access between the UK and EU comes to an end in December following a Brexit transition period. By October last year 1,441 EU-based firms had applied to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) for temporary permissions to operate in the UK after Brexit, according to figures obtained via a Freedom of Information request from regulatory consultancy Bovill. Over 1,000 of these firms do not currently have an office in the UK, suggesting they intend to establish their first office after the UK’s departure from the EU on 31 January.
    Fun and games 3:

    UK shrugs off Brexit uncertainty with backing of global CEOs

    Government hopes of an economic boost from an easing of Brexit uncertainty have been boosted by a poll showing that the UK is increasingly attractive to global businesses searching for growth and investment opportunities. The poll of almost 1,600 chief executives, by the consultancy and accounting firm PwC, found that at a time of growing nervousness the UK’s reputation for stability made it the fourth most important target for companies looking for markets. PWC said the rebound in the UK’s attractiveness had been particularly marked among German, French and Italian chief executives and had returned to levels last seen in 2015, the year before the EU referendum.

  42. #15642

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    The cheap bluster might work for your eBay garden gnome business Les. But it’s fooling nobody in Europe and only succeeding in freaking out UK industry.

    #fûckbusiness
    Shurlock,do you think it is now time for unity and go for the best deal for our nation? That the remainers ( I was strongly one of the group) forget the 'what if' but perhaps change to 'lets move on'. I know you want what is best for our country, the same as the majority who live here and so if the country actually went forward united, the EU may realise that they may just have to get real and negotiate properly. It is obviously a nonsense the French or another try to cherry pick what they want sorted before negotiation. Whilst we have division they can use this to weaken us in the negotiation.
    If you are in a negotiation you will full well know that if one of the opposition is a tad flaky you play on that person. If they are solid it is not so easy to know where to set your play.

  43. #15643

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    Only ten days and it's all over.
    Glad we can put all that nonesense behind us and we won't hear a word about it ever again.
    Hold tight though, once Boris has agreed everything and got Brexit done by next week as he promised on numerous occasions, that dam of investment is splitting open and flooding the country with billions of pounds.
    We are going to be knee-deep in cash, it's going to be a right old mess.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guided Missile View Post
    Fun and games:

    Shortages of food and medicine, crops rotting in the fields, no Romanian gypsies left to wash posh folks cars, empty supermarkets, pets interned in Calais, stockpiling, prepping, John Cleese emigrating. So that was all just b0ll0x after all. And to think there were idiots that fell for it.
    Why not wait until next year, when we have finally left and are clear about the circumstances, before going off half-cocked.

  45. #15645

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    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    Why not wait until next year, when we have finally left and are clear about the circumstances, before going off half-cocked.
    What? You are expecting Guided Missile to use some judgement and common sense before posting? I don't think that you have been paying attention on this thread.

    There is about as much chance of that happening as a concise, humourous comment from Les.

  46. #15646

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    What? You are expecting Guided Missile to use some judgement and common sense before posting? I don't think that you have been paying attention on this thread.

    There is about as much chance of that happening as a concise, humourous comment from Les.
    Did Gavyn tell you what to post whilst he is away in Davos?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    Did Gavyn tell you what to post whilst he is away in Davos?
    Do they not have Internet access in Switzerland ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    Do they not have Internet access in Switzerland ?
    Fingers crossed

  49. #15649

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    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    Do they not have Internet access in Switzerland ?
    They don't have internet where Les goes on "business" with his garden gnomes. That is why periodically he goes silent on this thread and is nothing to do with him not bring able to answer questions posed to him by Shurlock.

  50. #15650

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    They don't have internet where Les goes on "business" with his garden gnomes. That is why periodically he goes silent on this thread and is nothing to do with him not bring able to answer questions posed to him by Shurlock.
    whats the garden gnomes thing about????

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