View Poll Results: Saints Web Definitely Not Official Second Referendum

Voters
157. You may not vote on this poll
  • Leave Before - Leave Now

    34 21.66%
  • Leave Before - Remain Now

    8 5.10%
  • Leave Before - Not Bothered Now

    2 1.27%
  • Remain Before - Remain Now

    88 56.05%
  • Remain Before - Leave Now

    6 3.82%
  • Remain Before - Not Bothered Now

    0 0%
  • Not Bothered Before - Leave Now

    3 1.91%
  • Not Bothered Before - Remain Now

    4 2.55%
  • I've never been bothered - Why am I on this Thread?

    2 1.27%
  • No second Ref - 2016 was Definitive and Binding

    10 6.37%
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Thread: Brexit - Enter at Your Own Risk

  1. #15551

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    The election was effectively the fourth opportunity to decide on whether we stayed in the EU or left it. The first of course being the actual 2016 referendum itself, which gave a clear vote to leave. The second was the GE in 2017, where the majority of parties pledged in their manifestos that they would honour the referendum vote. The third was the EU elections where the biggest number of seats was won by a party whose sole purpose was to leave the EU and then in the latest GE the main party with a policy to leave won a stonking majority, when the other main parties had stood on manifestos to leave or hold another referendum. Of course, had the original referendum gone the other way, then the remoaners would have accused leavers of being bad losers for raking over the coals for years afterwards and bleating about how unfair it all was after the event, but they lack the self awareness to understand this. Somehow, losers consent doesn't apply to them.
    Doesn't change the fact that more people voted for parties that wanted to stop Brexit or hold a second vote, despite one of those parties being pretty much unelectable.

    The choice we had at the last election wasn't Bexit yes or No. It was Bexit yes, or maybe no but with a Marxist government led by an IRA-loving antisemite.

  2. #15552

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    You'll be dead long before we rejoin, Soggy. No doubt you'll whinge about the decision to leave right up until you draw your last breath though.
    I expect you are right Wes. But donít worry, although I doubt if I will ever change my mind about what a mistake this is, I am sure I will find other things to whinge about soon.

  3. #15553

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SORcX0J8ryo

    There are people as misguided as you in the EU parliament, Soggy. Once we're out, we're never going back.

  4. #15554

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    Lord Grieves, Lib Dumb Peer:
    [quote]"I am fearful that on 31 January some things may happen in some places that could be reminiscent of events in Germany in the early 1930s.”[/quote}

    What particularly qualified this stupid old duffer to be a suitable candidate for the House of Lords? What with other barmy peers such as Lord Adonis, the time has come to look seriously at replacing the HOL with an elected body more in tune with 21st century politics.

  5. #15555

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    [QUOTE=Wes Tender;2793547]Lord Grieves, Lib Dumb Peer:
    "I am fearful that on 31 January some things may happen in some places that could be reminiscent of events in Germany in the early 1930s.Ē[/quote}

    What particularly qualified this stupid old duffer to be a suitable candidate for the House of Lords? What with other barmy peers such as Lord Adonis, the time has come to look seriously at replacing the HOL with an elected body more in tune with 21st century politics.
    So you don't think there is any chance he may be correct ?

  6. Default

    [QUOTE=badgerx16;2793556]
    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    Lord Grieves, Lib Dumb Peer:

    So you don't think there is any chance he may be correct ?
    Nope, not in The UK. Within certain countries in The EU maybe, but not in tolerant outward looking UK.


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  7. #15557

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    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    So you don't think there is any chance he may be correct ?
    Did you think that me calling him a stupid old duffer inferred that I did? You're always going to get a small percentage of nutters across the political spectrum, but to draw comparisons with Germany in the thirties and the rise of Naziism just because we are leaving the EU is just plain barmy.

  8. #15558

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
    ....tolerant outward looking UK.
    LOL

  9. #15559

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    Did you think that me calling him a stupid old duffer inferred that I did? You're always going to get a small percentage of nutters across the political spectrum, but to draw comparisons with Germany in the thirties and the rise of Naziism just because we are leaving the EU is just plain barmy.
    Stupid old duffer? Takes one to know one, I guess.

  10. #15560

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    Stupid old duffer? Takes one to know one, I guess.
    Are you being self-deprecating there, Gavyn? That makes a change.

  11. #15561

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SORcX0J8ryo

    There are people as misguided as you in the EU parliament, Soggy. Once we're out, we're never going back.
    Really? They younger generation aren’t as blinkered as the old duffers who can’t understand that we don’t have an Empire anymore. I probably won’t live to see it but it would not surprise me to see us back in sometime.

  12. #15562

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadoldgit View Post
    ... we don’t have an Empire anymore.
    We still have Gibraltar, the Falklands, and Anguila.

  13. #15563

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    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    We still have Gibraltar, the Falklands, and Anguila.
    Don't forget the Chagos Islands...

  14. #15564

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashnats View Post
    Don't forget the Chagos Islands...
    Which belong to Mauritius according to the UN.

  15. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sadoldgit View Post
    Really? They younger generation arenít as blinkered as the old duffers who canít understand that we donít have an Empire anymore. I probably wonít live to see it but it would not surprise me to see us back in sometime.
    Donít talk pony man.

    The EU will collapse in the next 25 years. Itís unsustainable.


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    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    Which belong to Mauritius according to the UN.
    Not without a fight...

  17. #15567

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Duckhunter View Post
    Don’t talk pony man.

    The EU will collapse in the next 25 years. It’s unsustainable.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    What will be unsustainable will be dozens of countries thinking that they can go it alone like us when they are already in the second largest market in the world. It is in everyone’s interest to see that it works, including ours.

  18. #15568

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadoldgit View Post
    What will be unsustainable will be dozens of countries thinking that they can go alone like us when they are already in the second largest market in the world. It is in everyone’s interest to see that it works, including ours.
    Disagree. I hope for an EU collapse and then a close trading bloc between separate countries which doesn't involve ever closer political union.

  19. #15569

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    Quote Originally Posted by hypochondriac View Post
    Disagree. I hope for an EU collapse and then a close trading bloc between separate countries which doesn't involve ever closer political union.
    What, a Common Market, as it were?

  20. #15570

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    Glad to see characteristically strong understandings of how modern trade works

  21. #15571

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    Quote Originally Posted by hypochondriac View Post
    Disagree. I hope for an EU collapse and then a close trading bloc between separate countries which doesn't involve ever closer political union.
    You don’t believe that the EU has contributed to the outbreak of peace in Europe since 1945 then?

  22. #15572

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadoldgit View Post
    You don’t believe that the EU has contributed to the outbreak of peace in Europe since 1945 then?
    The outbreak of peace? Like it's some sort of disease?

  23. #15573

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    Quote Originally Posted by Weston Super Saint View Post
    The outbreak of peace? Like it's some sort of disease?
    It was a tongue in cheek remark, but I do wish that peace was contagious. We have been very lucky to live in relatively peaceful times (for us). The world is shrinking all the time and narrow, introspective thinking of the 19th century no longer serves us in the 21st century. It makes more sense to work more closely with our neighbours (and I mean that for all European countries) than it does to go back to the self interests of nationalism. The EU may not be perefect, but it is far better for us all than that old system of alliances that not only divided us, but brought about devastation across Europe and beyond.

  24. #15574

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadoldgit View Post
    You donít believe that the EU has contributed to the outbreak of peace in Europe since 1945 then?
    I think modern society and mutually assured destruction can achieve that in the future without the EU.

  25. #15575

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    Given that the nuclear deterrent did stop Argentina invading the Falklands, didn’t stop the ethnic cleansing in Eastern Europe and has had no effect on the conflicts in the Middle East, I don’t have a great deal of faith in the MAD concept. Would you expect anyone in Europe to launch nuclear weapons next door to themselves?

  26. #15576

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadoldgit View Post
    Given that the nuclear deterrent did stop Argentina invading the Falklands, didnít stop the ethnic cleansing in Eastern Europe and has had no effect on the conflicts in the Middle East, I donít have a great deal of faith in the MAD concept. Would you expect anyone in Europe to launch nuclear weapons next door to themselves?
    I don't think we will descend into warring accross Europe simply because political union is no longer a thing. I mean it used to just be a common market and there wasn't war then.

  27. #15577

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    We probably won’t. But European nations have been a lot closer since the formation Common Market and the EU. Moves back to nationalism and all that follows with pursuing national interests takes us right back to times when conflict of interests can lead to instability. The more tribes you have the greater the chances of tribal conflict.

  28. #15578

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    Default Brexit - Enter at Your Own Risk

    Has brexit cost more than our total previous contribution to the EU, or is this more Ďponyí?
    https://apple.news/AzSC2TP2eS4CWXfi5xDsIGQ

  29. #15579

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    Quote Originally Posted by hypochondriac View Post
    Disagree. I hope for an EU collapse and then a close trading bloc between separate countries which doesn't involve ever closer political union.
    Then would you campaign to rejoin?

  30. #15580

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fan The Flames View Post
    Then would you campaign to rejoin?
    It wouldn't be the EU then, would it?

  31. #15581

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    A quick primer on trade for dummies and stupid old duffers.

    I. If you believe in free trade, then the Common Market is a sideshow.
    II. Once upon a time, tariffs used to be the main impediment to trade - hence the emergence of the Common Market. However, thanks to global and regional efforts over the past half century, tariffs have fallen to a point where in most cases they are trivial.
    III. Today the real barrier to trade is regulation - the fact that businesses must deal with overlapping, conflicting and complex regulations whenever they trade across borders. Complying with different rules of the game pushes up the cost of exporting and reduces business activity.
    IV. Regulatory alignment is a way of reducing these costs. It also seeks to promote competition by integrating a market that would otherwise be fragmented and inefficiently small. Note alignment is a relative concept: sometimes it’s prescriptive; in other cases, it’s very loose, leaving regulatees plenty of discretion on how to meet outcomes.
    V. Either way, regulatory alignment is inherently political. A country’s regulation says a lot about its values, how it balances risk and safety, price and quality, individualism and collectivism as well as the priority it gives to different stakeholders, including the environment.
    VI. In other words, getting countries with different preferences to align on a regulatory standard, regardless whether it is loose or prescriptive, implies processes to manage and resolve these competing demands. That could be done by fiat - or it could be done as fairly and democratically as possible. Enter political institutions and impartial enforcement mechanisms to ensure countries are subsequently keeping their word.

    Invoking the Common Market is basically a giveaway that you’re clueless about trade. Likewise it is clueless to champion free trade without understanding where it necessarily leads you in the 21st century i.e. regulatory alignment when most of the low-hanging fruit has been picked.
    Last edited by shurlock; 17-01-2020 at 08:21 AM.

  32. #15582

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fan The Flames View Post
    Then would you campaign to rejoin?
    I'd sign up to a strictly trade based bloc absolutely.

  33. #15583

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    Quote Originally Posted by hypochondriac View Post
    I'd sign up to a strictly trade based bloc absolutely.

  34. #15584

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    A quick primer on trade for dummies and stupid old duffers.

    I. If you believe in free trade, then the Common Market is a sideshow.
    II. Once upon a time, tariffs used to be the main impediment to trade - hence the emergence of the Common Market. However, thanks to global and regional efforts over the past half century, tariffs have fallen to a point where in most cases they are trivial.
    III. Today the real barrier to trade is regulation - the fact that businesses must deal with overlapping, conflicting and complex regulations whenever they trade across borders. Complying with different rules of the game pushes up the cost of exporting and reduces business activity.
    IV. Regulatory alignment is a way of reducing these costs. It also seeks to promote competition by integrating a market that would otherwise be fragmented and inefficiently small. Note alignment is a relative concept: sometimes itís prescriptive; in other cases, itís very loose, leaving regulatees plenty of discretion on how to meet outcomes.
    V. Either way, regulatory alignment is inherently political. A countryís regulation says a lot about its values, how it balances risk and safety, price and quality, individualism and collectivism as well as the priority it gives to different stakeholders, including the environment.
    VI. In other words, getting countries with different preferences to align on a regulatory standard, regardless whether it is loose or prescriptive, implies processes to manage and resolve these competing demands. That could be done by fiat - or it could be done as fairly and democratically as possible. Enter political institutions and impartial enforcement mechanisms to ensure countries are subsequently keeping their word.

    Invoking the Common Market is basically a giveaway that youíre clueless about trade. Likewise it is clueless to champion free trade without understanding where it necessarily leads you in the 21st century i.e. regulatory alignment when most of the low-hanging fruit has been picked.
    I mentioned the Common Market in an ironic way, but you don't do irony, do you? I was being flippant about how we started off all those years ago before the whole thing morphed in the direction of a United States of Europe via the Maastricht, Amsterdam, Nice and Lisbon treaties without the electorate having the opportunity to vote on any of them, and now we will revert back to trading with the EU either with a free trade arrangement that suits us, or on WTO terms. Further down the line, the EU will fall apart because the Euro will collapse and other member states will follow us out of the door when they see how beneficial it was for our economy outside of the EU straightjacket. I give it a decade.

  35. #15585

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    I mentioned the Common Market in an ironic way, but you don't do irony, do you? I was being flippant about how we started off all those years ago before the whole thing morphed in the direction of a United States of Europe via the Maastricht, Amsterdam, Nice and Lisbon treaties without the electorate having the opportunity to vote on any of them, and now we will revert back to trading with the EU either with a free trade arrangement that suits us, or on WTO terms. Further down the line, the EU will fall apart because the Euro will collapse and other member states will follow us out of the door when they see how beneficial it was for our economy outside of the EU straightjacket. I give it a decade.
    Les you don't know what free trade means or what the WTO does - so best stay in your own lane and not get too ahead of yourself. I'm also still waiting for the great domino effect of 2016, so I'd hold off any new predictions if I were you pal.

    One last time: you cannot have truly free trade without regulatory alignment that, in turn, necessitates some form of political integration (unless you want to do a Norway and be bound by regulation that you have had no say in shaping or determining).
    Last edited by shurlock; 17-01-2020 at 12:05 PM.

  36. #15586

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    I'm also still waiting for the great domino effect of 2016, so I'd hold off any new predictions if I were you pal.
    It seems to have gone right over your head that we haven't yet left the EU and that any inclination for other nations to follow us out will be influenced by how well we fare economically once freed from the EU's straightjacket. As you know, other countries have voted to leave the EU and then held second referendums which overturned that decision. The EU and the remoaner establishment, aided by a majority in the House, did their best to engineer a second referendum here too, in order that we thickos who didn't know what we had voted for, could change our minds and make the right decision if given the chance. When we are finally out, then those others who might join us will wait to see what sort of deal we can arrange with the EU on the one hand, and with the rest of the World on the other.

    When it comes to predicting our economic prospects, I bet that you were among the cognoscenti who thought it would be economically damaging if we didn't join the eurozone and that just voting to leave the EU would result in the necessity for a punishment budget, a huge rise in unemployment, house prices and a fall in GDP that would cost the average household an extra £4300 per annum. What happened to that lot, eh?

    Prediction wise, I was confident that once having voted to leave the EU, that the best efforts of the remoaner establishment to thwart Brexit would fail eventually, that the broken promises to allow a referendum on those EU treaties would force a day of reckoning when the pent-up frustrations of the Europhobes would exact their retribution. As it turns out, the political wrangling by firstly Cameron and then the useless May, the 2015 and 2017 elections, the shenanigans from the remoaner dominated House and the rogue speaker, Chequers, the Benn Surrender Act, all conspired towards a fed-up and exasperated electorate giving Boris the stonking majority he needed to get Brexit done finally. In many ways, the three and a half years delay brought about a situation whereby we negotiate with the EU with a far stronger hand than before, the threat to leave without a deal and to trade on WTO terms being far more forcibly weaponised than previously. If it was the case that this outcome had been war-gamed in some way by Cummings and others since Boris took over, then indeed he has played a blinder.

    You are on the wrong side of history on this issue, Gavyn, so I am not about to pay much attention to advice from you about what I think will happen in the future post-Brexit. I believe that we will thrive. You will have to wait a few years in order to crow about how you were right and I was wrong. But you will be the disappointed one again.

  37. #15587

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    It seems to have gone right over your head that we haven't yet left the EU and that any inclination for other nations to follow us out will be influenced by how well we fare economically once freed from the EU's straightjacket. As you know, other countries have voted to leave the EU and then held second referendums which overturned that decision. The EU and the remoaner establishment, aided by a majority in the House, did their best to engineer a second referendum here too, in order that we thickos who didn't know what we had voted for, could change our minds and make the right decision if given the chance. When we are finally out, then those others who might join us will wait to see what sort of deal we can arrange with the EU on the one hand, and with the rest of the World on the other.

    When it comes to predicting our economic prospects, I bet that you were among the cognoscenti who thought it would be economically damaging if we didn't join the eurozone and that just voting to leave the EU would result in the necessity for a punishment budget, a huge rise in unemployment, house prices and a fall in GDP that would cost the average household an extra £4300 per annum. What happened to that lot, eh?

    Prediction wise, I was confident that once having voted to leave the EU, that the best efforts of the remoaner establishment to thwart Brexit would fail eventually, that the broken promises to allow a referendum on those EU treaties would force a day of reckoning when the pent-up frustrations of the Europhobes would exact their retribution. As it turns out, the political wrangling by firstly Cameron and then the useless May, the 2015 and 2017 elections, the shenanigans from the remoaner dominated House and the rogue speaker, Chequers, the Benn Surrender Act, all conspired towards a fed-up and exasperated electorate giving Boris the stonking majority he needed to get Brexit done finally. In many ways, the three and a half years delay brought about a situation whereby we negotiate with the EU with a far stronger hand than before, the threat to leave without a deal and to trade on WTO terms being far more forcibly weaponised than previously. If it was the case that this outcome had been war-gamed in some way by Cummings and others since Boris took over, then indeed he has played a blinder.

    You are on the wrong side of history on this issue, Gavyn, so I am not about to pay much attention to advice from you about what I think will happen in the future post-Brexit. I believe that we will thrive. You will have to wait a few years in order to crow about how you were right and I was wrong. But you will be the disappointed one again.
    Straitjacket rather than straightjacket is the normal, correct spelling of the word.

    If you are going to write tedious tosh, you could at least spell correctly.

  38. #15588

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    Straitjacket rather than straightjacket is the normal, correct spelling of the word.

    If you are going to write tedious tosh, you could at least spell correctly.
    Is that really the best response you can muster? Both are permissible. It isn't like you to be a petty, small-minded nit-picker. Oh, sorry, it is.

  39. #15589

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    Is that really the best response you can muster? Both are permissible. It isn't like you to be a petty, small-minded nit-picker. Oh, sorry, it is.
    Dont blame me if I fall asleep after reading the first sentence. Why not try to be more concise and less repetitive?

    ... and by the way, improve your spelling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    Dont blame me if I fall asleep after reading the first sentence. Why not try to be more concise and less repetitive?

    ... and by the way, improve your spelling.
    I've already told you, it is permissible to spell it both ways. Who cares whether my opinion renders you dozy? If all you can do is nit-pick, and then not even make a good job of that, you'll just make yourself look like a prat.

  41. #15591

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    I've already told you, it is permissible to spell it both ways. Who cares whether my opinion renders you dozy? If all you can do is nit-pick, and then not even make a good job of that, you'll just make yourself look like a prat.
    Straightjacket has only become common amongst those who don't know how to spell.

    Next thing you'll be calling it the Dover Straight not to mention that famous rock group Dire Straights.

  42. #15592

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whitey Grandad View Post

    Next thing you'll be calling it the Dover Straight not to mention that famous rock group Dire Straights.

    No I won't. My knowledge of geography and pop music won't allow it.

  43. #15593

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    Noun

    straightjacket

    1. Misspelling of straitjacket.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    A quick primer on trade for dummies and stupid old duffers.

    I. If you believe in free trade, then the Common Market is a sideshow.
    II. Once upon a time, tariffs used to be the main impediment to trade - hence the emergence of the Common Market. However, thanks to global and regional efforts over the past half century, tariffs have fallen to a point where in most cases they are trivial.
    III. Today the real barrier to trade is regulation - the fact that businesses must deal with overlapping, conflicting and complex regulations whenever they trade across borders. Complying with different rules of the game pushes up the cost of exporting and reduces business activity.
    IV. Regulatory alignment is a way of reducing these costs. It also seeks to promote competition by integrating a market that would otherwise be fragmented and inefficiently small. Note alignment is a relative concept: sometimes it’s prescriptive; in other cases, it’s very loose, leaving regulatees plenty of discretion on how to meet outcomes.
    V. Either way, regulatory alignment is inherently political. A country’s regulation says a lot about its values, how it balances risk and safety, price and quality, individualism and collectivism as well as the priority it gives to different stakeholders, including the environment.
    VI. In other words, getting countries with different preferences to align on a regulatory standard, regardless whether it is loose or prescriptive, implies processes to manage and resolve these competing demands. That could be done by fiat - or it could be done as fairly and democratically as possible. Enter political institutions and impartial enforcement mechanisms to ensure countries are subsequently keeping their word.

    Invoking the Common Market is basically a giveaway that you’re clueless about trade. Likewise it is clueless to champion free trade without understanding where it necessarily leads you in the 21st century i.e. regulatory alignment when most of the low-hanging fruit has been picked.
    Exactly, thank-you

  45. #15595

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    Quote Originally Posted by badgerx16 View Post
    Noun

    straightjacket

    1. Misspelling of straitjacket.
    Oh dear, here is a misspelling of the word on a Politico report, even worse as it is shown as two words. It is difficult to keep these people on the strait and narrow, isn't it?

    https://www.politico.eu/article/fran...de-montchalin/

    Which one of you pedants is going to contact them to put it right?

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  47. #15597

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    Les no need to squirm and take yourself so seriously pal

    Freudian slip Friday?
    Last edited by shurlock; 17-01-2020 at 05:58 PM.

  48. #15598

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Tender View Post
    It seems to have gone right over your head that we haven't yet left the EU and that any inclination for other nations to follow us out will be influenced by how well we fare economically once freed from the EU's straightjacket. As you know, other countries have voted to leave the EU and then held second referendums which overturned that decision. The EU and the remoaner establishment, aided by a majority in the House, did their best to engineer a second referendum here too, in order that we thickos who didn't know what we had voted for, could change our minds and make the right decision if given the chance. When we are finally out, then those others who might join us will wait to see what sort of deal we can arrange with the EU on the one hand, and with the rest of the World on the other.

    When it comes to predicting our economic prospects, I bet that you were among the cognoscenti who thought it would be economically damaging if we didn't join the eurozone and that just voting to leave the EU would result in the necessity for a punishment budget, a huge rise in unemployment, house prices and a fall in GDP that would cost the average household an extra £4300 per annum. What happened to that lot, eh?

    Prediction wise, I was confident that once having voted to leave the EU, that the best efforts of the remoaner establishment to thwart Brexit would fail eventually, that the broken promises to allow a referendum on those EU treaties would force a day of reckoning when the pent-up frustrations of the Europhobes would exact their retribution. As it turns out, the political wrangling by firstly Cameron and then the useless May, the 2015 and 2017 elections, the shenanigans from the remoaner dominated House and the rogue speaker, Chequers, the Benn Surrender Act, all conspired towards a fed-up and exasperated electorate giving Boris the stonking majority he needed to get Brexit done finally. In many ways, the three and a half years delay brought about a situation whereby we negotiate with the EU with a far stronger hand than before, the threat to leave without a deal and to trade on WTO terms being far more forcibly weaponised than previously. If it was the case that this outcome had been war-gamed in some way by Cummings and others since Boris took over, then indeed he has played a blinder.

    You are on the wrong side of history on this issue, Gavyn, so I am not about to pay much attention to advice from you about what I think will happen in the future post-Brexit. I believe that we will thrive. You will have to wait a few years in order to crow about how you were right and I was wrong. But you will be the disappointed one again.
    No I don’t know Les. Can you kindly elucidate?

  49. #15599

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    Quote Originally Posted by shurlock View Post
    No I don’t know Les. Can you kindly elucidate?
    If he does it will be several paragraphs longer than it should be ... with several spelling errors.
    Last edited by Tamesaint; 17-01-2020 at 10:42 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamesaint View Post
    If he does it will be many paragraphs of tedium... with several spelling errors.
    Or per his MO, he slinks off and doesn't respond because he's made a factual howler.

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