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Recreational marijuana legal in Colorado


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Pot-smokers around the world are enviously looking through a haze of smoke at Colorado, USA. The state is the first in the US to regulate and allow the sale of marijuana for recreational purposes. The state has previously allowed sale for medicinal use, as documented in a hilarious South Park episode. This thing is the real deal.

 

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Critics say that the deal is the worst of all worlds, and that legal supply will just make it easier for kids to get a hold of it.

 

That said, this marks a remarkable turnaround in policy, if even at a local level, from thirty years past. I cannot imagine weed being legal in Colorado at the height of the war on drugs era.

 

Is this the break in Anglo-American dam when it comes to drug policy? Will Colorado be a trail-blazer for general legalisation, or the cautionary tale that lets us all know it's a f*cking terrible idea?

 

http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-colorado-pot-cannibus-sale-20140101,0,3200885.story#axzz2pEW75zAm

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Is this cos of columbine?

 

Maybe it's because they fancied making money out of distribution instead of spending money trying to shut it down.

 

Novel idea, that :)

 

It'll be interesting to see how much dosh they announce they've made.

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It's $300 an ounce, seems a bit prohibitive for the kidz. Washington (state) is next up. I'm all for it, personally and would certainly drinke less if I could have easy access to some mary jane man. Surely there will follow easy ways to take it without using tobacco or rigging up a hubbly bubbly. I don't see any resin on sale from the TV images.

 

I heard tax revenue of 10 million.

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There's such a big cannabis culture here that it's a missed opportunity not to capitalise on it with legalisation and taxation. It just makes sense to start earning money from something that's already been taking place in this country for decades, and hopefully remove some of the stigma and most of the criminal activity within it. As for the argument of "what about the children!?", even in the sleepy little village that I grew up in, if you wanted to score it was just a phonecall and a 10 minute walk away.

 

Fact is, the culture is so widespread and deep-rooted that it's not going to go away here, so the only logical step is to legalise and start reaping some benefits from it.

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There's such a big cannabis culture here that it's a missed opportunity not to capitalise on it with legalisation and taxation. It just makes sense to start earning money from something that's already been taking place in this country for decades, and hopefully remove some of the stigma and most of the criminal activity within it. As for the argument of "what about the children!?", even in the sleepy little village that I grew up in, if you wanted to score it was just a phonecall and a 10 minute walk away.

 

Fact is, the culture is so widespread and deep-rooted that it's not going to go away here, so the only logical step is to legalise and start reaping some benefits from it.

 

No disagreement from me, Super Michael.

 

The whole prohibition thing is a triple whammy. Spend money trying to enforce it, many of your distributors are on benefits when they could be legitimate businessmen putting money into the system, and it's something that can be produced soup-to-nuts in the UK.

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Disaster or success is will be interesting to see what happens.

 

Personally I can't understand the ban on it, especially when things like alcohol cause far more damage, yet there is no call to ban that.

 

I also agree with the sentiments above that it makes no sense. You are in effect spending millions/billions trying to stop something you simply can't stop, so why not regulate it, take it out of the hands of criminals and make some cash on it.

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http://boingboing.net/2014/01/01/the-gruesome-reality-of-the-dr.html

 

Strong case for legalising all drugs and taxing them.

 

I was going to reply to this last night, but ended up spending an hour reading up on the Mexican Drug War.

 

Fk me. The situation down there really can't be good for long-term US security. Cartels like Los Zetas and the Sinaloa hold sway over almost half of Mexico. Los Zetas started out as professional mercenaries working for another cartel (which in itself, gives an idea of the power of the cartels - able to raise private mercenary armies).

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There's such a big cannabis culture here that it's a missed opportunity not to capitalise on it with legalisation and taxation. It just makes sense to start earning money from something that's already been taking place in this country for decades, and hopefully remove some of the stigma and most of the criminal activity within it. As for the argument of "what about the children!?", even in the sleepy little village that I grew up in, if you wanted to score it was just a phonecall and a 10 minute walk away.

.

 

I hear this ALL THE TIME! Is it true? It was never true for me - always involved approaching dodgy individuals in dodgy pubs, probably buying rose frickin tea 50% of the time. I knew some 20 yolds (when I was late thirties) who always had plentiful supply, but they wouldn't sell to me (probably on the grounds I looked like the police). But if every teenage kid was networked to a definite supply, surely someone has to be taking a pretty big risk. The person you make the phone call to would have to know someone who deals, and that dealer would likely be connected to a slightly bigger dealer. As you go up the tree it gets a bit uglier and a bit less fun. And all these gobby teenagers spouting off about twhere they got their gear. This is driven by pure jealousy, I obviously wasn't in the cool gang!

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Everyone I know that smokes it is a proper tit and acts like a sloth 24/7. It's a drug for no-marks.

 

Exactly. If it messes up your brain then it must be doing some damage.

 

So what's the drug for marks? Which doesn't mess up your brain? Alcohol? Religion?

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I hear this ALL THE TIME! Is it true? It was never true for me - always involved approaching dodgy individuals in dodgy pubs, probably buying rose frickin tea 50% of the time. I knew some 20 yolds (when I was late thirties) who always had plentiful supply, but they wouldn't sell to me (probably on the grounds I looked like the police). But if every teenage kid was networked to a definite supply, surely someone has to be taking a pretty big risk. The person you make the phone call to would have to know someone who deals, and that dealer would likely be connected to a slightly bigger dealer. As you go up the tree it gets a bit uglier and a bit less fun. And all these gobby teenagers spouting off about twhere they got their gear. This is driven by pure jealousy, I obviously wasn't in the cool gang!

 

I don't know anyone that doesn't at least "know a guy who knows a guy". Middle class, middle England is pretty much a haven for those who deal in the sticky stuff. Less police about, more bored kids with a bit of pocket money. Living in Portswood now it's kind of a similar game with all the students about. Never gotten into it too much myself though, barring a couple of trips to Dam and the occasional smoke with some mates.

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I see so many people f*cked up by pot with serious paranoid delusions and other health issues. It isn't without its substantial downside don't kid yourselves.

 

I've seen so many people f*cked up by drink with drink driving, physical addiction and violent rage. It isn't without its substantial downsides either.

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I see so many people f*cked up by pot with serious paranoid delusions and other health issues. It isn't without its substantial downside don't kid yourselves.

 

Totally agree with this. People who drink liquor first thing in the morning are as much at risk as people who have a spliff when they get up. If you have no controlled situation when consuming your drug of choice, you're going to be in trouble. Maybe smoking spliff any time in the day is more socially acceptable than drinking in the day? I don't know, but if it is, mental problems are inevitable.

 

I'd like to choose my drug, for me, alcohol is worse than marijuana.

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Problem seems to be that strands of weed now are very, very strong compared to the weed of years gone by.

 

Personally I think it should be legalised and taxed.

 

I do as well. I've said for years that certain drugs could be properly manufactured, under strictly licensed conditions and then sold officially and taxed (as per alcohol, nicotine, caffeine) - if manufacturing of it was to strict guidelines, there is no reason why you couldn't buy weed or MDMA (maybe even others like coke) officially. I think you'd have to draw the line at really hardcore drugs though??

 

It'd stop a lot of crime (from importing, to dealing, to stealing to pay for is) - maybe that's my naive view, but I do believe that.

 

It's about time the world got modern though. Weed in this country would be a great starting point. Although not a lover of the stuff myself, I have a couple of friends who smoke shed loads of the stuff, probably in comparable amounts to the amount of alcohol I consume. So what's the difference?

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Totally agree with this. People who drink liquor first thing in the morning are as much at risk as people who have a spliff when they get up. If you have no controlled situation when consuming your drug of choice, you're going to be in trouble. Maybe smoking spliff any time in the day is more socially acceptable than drinking in the day? I don't know, but if it is, mental problems are inevitable.

 

I'd like to choose my drug, for me, alcohol is worse than marijuana.

 

Think you're over-egging things here. In any case from my point of view the health impacts of weed are neither here nor there. Prohibition is a costly failure and it makes no sense to potentially criminalise hundreds of thousands of people because they partake in consuming it. A different approach is needed so it will be interesting to see what Colorado makes of it in 2, 3, 5 or 10 years time.

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I don't think anyone serious on the anti-prohibition side of the debate would argue that excessive cannabis consumption will definitely not have ill-effects. However, the fact of the matter is that an extremely large amount of individuals already use it on a regular basis. The interesting thing about where it has been allowed is that consumption does not actually go up, but health problems do decrease as would be expected when you move from an illicit market without regulation to one which is carefully controlled for quality and such. What is also interesting is that hard-drug use like that of heroin which is a far more damaging drug than cannabis also falls where prohibition is lifted. And of course you also take a lot of money out of the hands of criminal enterprises and into state coffers.

 

So there are clear societal wide health benefits, state finance benefits and potential criminality reductions from lifting prohibition. I don't know what we are waiting for.

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Have you ever known someone with a paranoid delusion? There fairly easy to spot.

 

Not necessarily, they range from mild to psychotic. It's highly addictive and the fact that it's smoked aligns it with the health risks of smoking which most people agree isn't a very good thing.

 

I have 15 years experience working alongside the local substance misuse service. And although I may have par taken in my youth I wouldn't go near the stuff ever again.

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and yet it didn't and hasn't put off hundreds of thousands of people who have taken it and continue to do so.

 

But that's like the law against speeding. I speed sometimes but it doesn't mean I want speed limits abolished. Decriminalising tends to make things more socially acceptable and therefore more widespread. The trick is how you allow occasional recreational use and prohibit intense use of things like skunk - which can and does lead to long term psychosis.

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But that's like the law against speeding. I speed sometimes but it doesn't mean I want speed limits abolished.

 

Irrelevant. The point is that prohibition has failed to prevent widespread use of weed.

 

Decriminalising tends to make things more socially acceptable and therefore more widespread. The trick is how you allow occasional recreational use and prohibit intense use of things like skunk - which can and does lead to long term psychosis.

 

Ironically the cause of the rise of skunk is that prohibition has provided an incentive to dramatically increase the potency and therefore value of smuggled and illegal grown drugs. One of the problems of weed being illegal is that it inhibits proper research into the health impacts of drugs with the mental health impacts poorly understood.

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Not necessarily, they range from mild to psychotic. It's highly addictive and the fact that it's smoked aligns it with the health risks of smoking which most people agree isn't a very good thing.

 

I have 15 years experience working alongside the local substance misuse service. And although I may have par taken in my youth I wouldn't go near the stuff ever again.

 

Highly addictive? sounds a little exaggerated if you ask me.

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and yet it didn't and hasn't put off hundreds of thousands of people who have taken it and continue to do so.

 

But it being illegal did put me off doing it when I was younger. Legalising it will just make it more acceptable and accessible and I don't think it's a wise move even if it does make some money through tax.

 

Alcohol is a very good example of a drug that has been made normal and accessible to everyone - look at the problems caused by that.

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But it being illegal did put me off doing it when I was younger. Legalising it will just make it more acceptable and accessible and I don't think it's a wise move even if it does make some money through tax.

 

Alcohol is a very good example of a drug that has been made normal and accessible to everyone - look at the problems caused by that.

 

But you wouldn't argue that prohibition would do any good for alcohol would you?

 

The answer is to legalise with effective and strictly enforced controls. Ever been to the US? bloody difficult to get hold of booze under the age of 21. I've seen it put that teenagers find it easier to get hold of booze in so-called dry states because black marker suppliers will supply to anyone regardless of age.

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But you wouldn't argue that prohibition would do any good for alcohol would you?

 

The answer is to legalise with effective and strictly enforced controls. Ever been to the US? bloody difficult to get hold of booze under the age of 21. I've seen it put that teenagers find it easier to get hold of booze in so-called dry states because black marker suppliers will supply to anyone regardless of age.

 

Alcohol is ingrained in our culture so suddenly banning it wouldn't work. Cannabis is not the same. it's widely used but it's not normal to have a joint with your nan whilst eating Sunday lunch (in most houses).

 

I just think making it illegal puts off many people, especially kids, from doing it which is a good thing. Of course thousands of people will do it anyway, doesn't mean a war is being lost.

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Alcohol is ingrained in our culture so suddenly banning it wouldn't work. Cannabis is not the same. it's widely used but it's not normal to have a joint with your nan whilst eating Sunday lunch (in most houses).

 

I just think making it illegal puts off many people, especially kids, from doing it which is a good thing. Of course thousands of people will do it anyway, doesn't mean a war is being lost.

 

lol yeah its all going swimmingly

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It has come a good 15 years after I stopped smoking it on a daily basis. Then 9 years ago I gave smoking all together and have not smoked a joint or a cigarette since.

 

I get the urge to smoke it again, but have the fear that I would take up cigarette smoking again, so contemplating brownies!

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No disagreement from me, Super Michael.

 

The whole prohibition thing is a triple whammy. Spend money trying to enforce it, many of your distributors are on benefits when they could be legitimate businessmen putting money into the system, and it's something that can be produced soup-to-nuts in the UK.

 

Which one of the films are you saying the UK produce.

 

From Soup to Nuts, a 1928 short comedy film starring Laurel and Hardy as butlers hired for a high society dinner party

Soup to Nuts, a 1930 feature film starring the trio who later became the Three Stooges

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  • 2 weeks later...
It has come a good 15 years after I stopped smoking it on a daily basis. Then 9 years ago I gave smoking all together and have not smoked a joint or a cigarette since.

 

I get the urge to smoke it again, but have the fear that I would take up cigarette smoking again, so contemplating brownies!

 

Nicotine is addictive; THC is not. If you took up smoking joints again, that would not prompt you to also take up cigarettes - unless the "oral fixation" was an important component in the reason for your smoking.

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  • 2 months later...

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