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Cardiff/Sala - Missing Plane


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On 31/03/2019 at 19:21, derry said:

The colour blindness issue is conjecture. When I was enrolling in a Commercial Licence course I had to go to the Central Medical Establishment for a full medical. Fail any part of it and I wouldn't have been able to start the course. This was in spite of passing the RAF aircrew initial medical previously. Tillotson was previously on a CPL course which he didn't complete.

I can't see how he got that far if he was colour blind but he might have been.

 

What seems to be fact, he had a PPL but did not have a night rating which again is strange as it only requires 5 hours night flying and 5 hours ground study. What is criminal. is that the passenger was totally misled, probably thinking that it was a professional organisation and a professional pilot. Whatever anyone says I will never believe that the pilot didn't know he wasn't allowed to do the flight, at night in an unauthorised aircraft over water. The footballer was the innocent abroad. All the others involved will get theirs in due course.

We have yet to hear anything about or from David Henderson who according to his videos has been operating the aircraft for some time. The authorities will be following this trail.

 

The only ones to come out covered in roses are the insurance companies who can wash their hands of any claims.

Henderson got his jail sentence today.

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On 12/11/2021 at 20:20, Doctoroncall said:

He is likely to appeal. His defence lawyers are currently looking into it. 

Henderson has a bloody nerve. He organised a flight with a pilot he knew did not have the necessary qualifications but none of that mattered because he was getting mega money for it. The evidence against him at his trial was huge with incriminating e-mails, hoping others would lie to save his sorry skin. He received 18 months which I consider an insult to the family of Sala and the pilot, Ibbotson. I hope the judge locks him up and throws away the key.

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I have to say the notion of an appeal disturbs me too. All pilots want to build their hours but Ibbotson was culpable too and apparently not the most accurate of pilots.

My best friend has not long got her PPL (H) and one of the reasons I feel safe going up with her is because if there is any issue - with the conditions, the aircraft, whatever, I know she'll say NO.

 

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Henderson can appeal. However employing a private pilot who didn't possess a night rating at night in a non approved foreign aircraft that the pilot's rating to fly had expired, together with the fact that the aircraft was single engined and illegal to operate commercially over water at night and hadn't been approved by anybody to carry out flights.. 

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15 hours ago, derry said:

Henderson can appeal. However employing a private pilot who didn't possess a night rating at night in a non approved foreign aircraft that the pilot's rating to fly had expired, together with the fact that the aircraft was single engined and illegal to operate commercially over water at night and hadn't been approved by anybody to carry out flights.. 

I assume that by appealing he risks having his sentenced increased?  Tbh, it sounds like he is the primary person culpable for the death of two people, should probably take the 18 months and run (well not literally as he can't).

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With the obvious expertise that some members of the forum are able to bring to this thread I have found it very interesting from the off.  As somebody who used to fly regularly for work reasons on commercial aircraft I never really felt uncomfortable or particularly worried about bad practice or poor service levels.  Obviously I was flying with main commercial carriers and it all seemed pretty routine. 

However, given the raft of breaches that have been uncovered since this particular incident I just wonder how prevalent these offences are?  Had this aircraft not crashed, the flight had been successful, non of the breaches would've come to light - life would've just gone on.  So just how much of this 'cutting corners' is 'the norm' and how often does it actually happen?

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1 hour ago, Micky said:

However, given the raft of breaches that have been uncovered since this particular incident I just wonder how prevalent these offences are?  Had this aircraft not crashed, the flight had been successful, non of the breaches would've come to light - life would've just gone on.  So just how much of this 'cutting corners' is 'the norm' and how often does it actually happen?

It's a good question and maybe issues are more prevalent on the boundaries of private and commercial aviation, but I think personal attitudes impacting flying can impact anywhere. Have a look at the incident report for the Air Maroc ATP incident a couple of years ago and you'll see horrifying levels of incompetence by commercial pilots. I mentioned above my bestie now doing her PPL rating on the Robinson. Recently she went up as ballast on the back seat for a check ride for another experienced PPL pilot. The instructor afterwards told her not to use that pilot as an example.. and she had already noted herself some sloppiness in the pilot's flying..

But I think this case is pretty exceptional, and I'd agree with others that the sentence doesn't seem harsh. I think we can guess Derry's view..

 

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4 hours ago, Lighthouse said:

I think he’s gotten off incredibly lightly if I’m honest. People in the industry have received longer sentences for incidents which, whilst negligent, were genuine mistakes, made in good faith.

I fully agree. 'Only' 18 months is outrageously light.

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As an example. An A320 crashed into the sea after attempting to carry out three visual approaches in Cavok conditions the pilot lost it on the third approach. All on board were killed. At this airport we were handled by the national carrier. A couple of weeks later I flew in there. I was completing the flight paperwork in their operations dept. In the course of conversation I asked what had happened with the A320.  The European ops officer raised his eyes to heaven and recounted a sorry tale. A young well connected man wanted to be a pilot, the airline sponsored him, he was totally unsuitable for all sorts of reasons but politically had to be passed, became a First Officer. After a few years his family status demanded that he be made a Captain. The crash was the result of him being unsuitable but well connected. Loss of face was/is a problem in some oriental airlines and has caused many crashes.

 

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Well David, there are some rum characters on the edge of aviation that I am sure those of us who have been involved for some time must have come across. I remember when I first learnt to fly in the 1950's my mother expressed her worries to the CFI, he calmly told her not to worry as aircraft were safe as houses it was the people that fly them you have to watch. I had come across Mr Henderson... I am not surprised that an incident happened.... I also think that his punishment does not reflect his crime.

Like in medicine the ability level in pilots ranges from just capable to ace, but most pilots will claim just to be average, just like surgeons, but if one gets a crew or a couple of just 'capable' together the odds are stacked against one!

 

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2 hours ago, West Stand said:

 aircraft were safe as houses it was the people that fly them you have to watch.

And the people who service them. One helicopter came back from maintenance without the Jesus nut tightened up.. Apprentice engineer and supervisor both at fault.

Mind you, a proper A check would have picked that up. Most accidents need more than one contributor it would seem.

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20 hours ago, West Stand said:

Well David, there are some rum characters on the edge of aviation that I am sure those of us who have been involved for some time must have come across. I remember when I first learnt to fly in the 1950's my mother expressed her worries to the CFI, he calmly told her not to worry as aircraft were safe as houses it was the people that fly them you have to watch. I had come across Mr Henderson... I am not surprised that an incident happened.... I also think that his punishment does not reflect his crime.

Like in medicine the ability level in pilots ranges from just capable to ace, but most pilots will claim just to be average, just like surgeons, but if one gets a crew or a couple of just 'capable' together the odds are stacked against one!

 

Hi Eric, We've all flown with or observed these people and just scratched our heads how they kept from the dreaded simulator chop. It always seemed to me that the aviation management in most companies was pretty poor and made keeping their heads down into an art form. 

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