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Saints Web Definitely Not Official Second Referendum  

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  1. 1. Saints Web Definitely Not Official Second Referendum

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    • Leave Before - Not Bothered Now
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1 hour ago, Wes Tender said:

Forecasts like those from the OBR and BoE are very long term, and rely on a lot of assumptions, basically guesswork. When Singapore left the Federation of Malysia, their GDP was half of the UK's. A few decades later, it is now double that in the UK. What did the forecasters predict for the Singapore economy at the time of their departure?

I think you mean GDP per capita, Wes.

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1 hour ago, ecuk268 said:

Lyn Truss looks like she's swallowed a wasp.

Southampton Freeport was started in 1983. The company still exists as Southampton Free Trade Zone but has been dormant for many years.

 

Ecuk
I tip my hat to you researching the status of Southampton Free Trade Zone.
For your further information it was originally set up by ABP using warehousing facilities vacated by Union Castle at 102 berth when the South African trade changed to containers.
It was also adversely affected by the Dockers Union wanting to be involved.
After the repeal of the Dock Labour Act in 1990, ABP built a new FTZ building up near 20 Gate which was subsequently taken over by a company called Import Services who continue to trade (and expand) this facility.

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1 hour ago, ecuk268 said:

What's that got to do with trade deals?

I imagine it has something to do with Thornberry's general poor grasp of facts. I think your reliance on this harridan to support your position is on pretty thin ice. She voted for the trade deal that Boris negotiated with the EU. Maybe you should post an interview with Diane Abbott. She didn't vote for the deal. On second thought, please don't. It was unpleasant enough watching Thornberry twice in one year.

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4 minutes ago, Guided Missile said:

I imagine it has something to do with Thornberry's general poor grasp of facts. I think your reliance on this harridan to support your position is on pretty thin ice. She voted for the trade deal that Boris negotiated with the EU. Maybe you should post an interview with Diane Abbott. She didn't vote for the deal. On second thought, please don't. It was unpleasant enough watching Thornberry twice in one year.

Exactly right. I didn't for one minute believe that there was any great deficiency in Liz Truss' reticence to answer the Duchess Thornberry's questions asking for statistical information on the Japan trade deal, compared to Thornberry's utterly humiliating shortcomings as Shadow Foreign Minister not able to name her counterparts in the French Government or in South Korea.

Talking of Diane Abbott, as Shadow Home Secretary, it is a toss-up as to which was the more incompetent of the two of them, but we must thank them heartily when added to Corbyn and McDonell as Shadow Chancellor for making Labour unelectable.

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2 hours ago, Guided Missile said:

I imagine it has something to do with Thornberry's general poor grasp of facts. I think your reliance on this harridan to support your position is on pretty thin ice. She voted for the trade deal that Boris negotiated with the EU. Maybe you should post an interview with Diane Abbott. She didn't vote for the deal. On second thought, please don't. It was unpleasant enough watching Thornberry twice in one year.

In that case, why didn't Truss explain her own department's figures? It's irrelevant how she voted, she just wanted a simple answer to a simple question.

And what's Abbott got to do with it?  

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1 hour ago, Wes Tender said:

Exactly right. I didn't for one minute believe that there was any great deficiency in Liz Truss' reticence to answer the Duchess Thornberry's questions asking for statistical information on the Japan trade deal, compared to Thornberry's utterly humiliating shortcomings as Shadow Foreign Minister not able to name her counterparts in the French Government or in South Korea.

Talking of Diane Abbott, as Shadow Home Secretary, it is a toss-up as to which was the more incompetent of the two of them, but we must thank them heartily when added to Corbyn and McDonell as Shadow Chancellor for making Labour unelectable.

Why didn't Truss answer? The question was clear enough

. As for incompetent politicians, Boris has a cabinet full of them, Williamson probably being the pick of the bunch.

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On 03/01/2021 at 16:16, buctootim said:

I'd like Johnson gone because he is a lying self serving shit who cant be trusted. I think he has also lost the confidence of most Tory MPs. However his lowest point has probably passed. Its starting to look a bit more likely he will survive past this year and if he does who knows what happens then. Would much prefer Sunak though.  

Come on, both Johnson and Sunak have completely dropped the ball again with Covid, they've had 10 months now and the numbers of deaths are worse than ever. Both useless. 

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14 hours ago, Wes Tender said:

Exactly right. I didn't for one minute believe that there was any great deficiency in Liz Truss' reticence to answer the Duchess Thornberry's questions asking for statistical information on the Japan trade deal, compared to Thornberry's utterly humiliating shortcomings as Shadow Foreign Minister not able to name her counterparts in the French Government or in South Korea.

Talking of Diane Abbott, as Shadow Home Secretary, it is a toss-up as to which was the more incompetent of the two of them, but we must thank them heartily when added to Corbyn and McDonell as Shadow Chancellor for making Labour unelectable.

You are a fool Wes an absolute fool  and your ilk inhabit a completely different world  which  is completely lacks understanding and reality  which will cause  great hardship to most people in this country - Leaving the EU is a complete  Shitshow

Just look as what is happening after only a few days as described in the Observer by people with experience 

 

 


Ministers must restart trade negotiations with Brussels immediately to sort out the “baffling” array of post-Brexit rules and regulations that now threaten much of the UK’s export trade to the EU, leading business groups have said.

Amid mounting anger among UK firms at cross-border friction they were told would not exist, British manufacturing and trade organisations met Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove in an emergency session on Thursday to discuss problems resulting from the deal struck by Boris Johnson with the EU before Christmas.

The prime minister had hailed what he claimed was a “zero-tariff” and “zero-quotas” deal that would allow free and simple access to the single market. Less than a month on, however, Britain’s EU departure appears to be anything but pain-free.

One leading figure involved in the talks with Gove described the new rule book as a “complete shitshow”. Another said Gove seemed “very concerned” at hearing reports of problems, after a week in which Marks & Spencer was among leading companies to warn that more bureaucracy would increase costs. The source added: “He [Gove] seemed to realise the full gravity of the situation that is unfolding and about to get worse.”


Gove admitted on Friday that there would be “significant additional disruption” at UK borders as a result of Brexit customs changes in the coming weeks.

In the first week after the UK finally left both the single market and customs union, the parcels firm DPD suspended some of its services, bookseller Waterstones halted sales to customers in the EU and UK fishermen warned they would not be able to sell their fresh produce into EU markets because of delays at borders.

There were also problems with consignments between Great Britain and Northern Ireland as new border checks caught many businesses unawares. Luxury food store Fortnum & Mason also told customers on its website: “We are temporarily unable to deliver to Northern Ireland or countries in the European Union”, while Debenhams has temporarily shut its online business in Ireland.

Some of the problems are being blamed on a rushed deal, and others on the sheer complexity of arrangements including “rules of origin”, some of which have not been finally determined. Only goods made up largely of parts that originate in the UK qualify as tariff-free.

Stephen Kelly, chief executive of the Northern Ireland business organisation Manufacturing NI, said: “The reason why the UK and EU originally agreed that there would be an implementation period of 11 months was so that people could get their heads around what was needed and assure their businesses were compliant. But we didn’t have that. We had seven days before everyone had to be ready, and one of those was Christmas Day.

“There is a big problem with GB businesses being unaware of their new responsibilities. We have the triple whammy here of Covid, Christmas and new customs rules arriving all at once without any time to adjust.”

Johnson assured Northern Ireland business owners in November 2019 that they would have “unfettered access” to the rest of the UK. “There will be no forms, no checks, no barriers of any kind,” he said. If anyone told them they needed to fill in forms, “tell them to ring up the PM and I will direct them to throw that form in the bin.”

The government was also facing pressure over its Brexit deal from the SNP. Ian Blackford, the party’s leader in Westminster, called on the UK government to “pay compensation to Scotland”, claiming a “multibillion compensation package” was needed to mitigate the costs of Brexit in Scotland.

Stephen Phipson, chief executive of the manufacturers’ organisation Make UK, said much still needed to be negotiated between the UK and EU. “Industry welcomed the trade agreement that avoided the catastrophe of no-deal, as tariffs and quotas would have been a disaster for exporters. However, this is only a starting point, as there are still substantial issues that need ironing out, with many months, if not years, of tough negotiations ahead.

“There are customs experts with 30 years’ experience who are baffled by what the new regulations mean, let alone small- and medium-sized businesses who have never had to deal with the kind of paperwork that is now required. The great fear is that for many it will prove too much and they will simply choose not to export to the EU.”

He also raised fears about the UK car industry, which could be adversely affected by tariffs if EU rules relating to the origins of components used in car manufacture cannot be met. “Having built up seamless and complex supply chains over decades, the automotive sector in the UK is facing a jolt to its systems that places its very future under threat,” he added. “While there is no suggestion multinationals will close plants overnight, we have already seen decisions to build new models placed elsewhere. As those models that have been built in the UK for many years come to the end of their life, we are likely to see a slow puncture for the sector of investment drifting away.”

Dominic Goudie head of international trade at the Food and Drink Federation said talks needed to re-start between the UK Brussels.

“Where problems emerge there will need to be further conversations,” he said. “The trade deal provides the means to do that. It is a question of whether is the will to do so” (after so many months of talks.”

Sam Lowe, a senior research fellow at the Centre for European Reform, said there were problems that could grow over coming weeks and months.

“The new import/export formalities are proving problematic for many companies. The lack of obvious queues at the border disguises the fact that many trucks are stuck in depots, unable to head to the ports due to their clients failing to provide the necessary documentation and information.”
 


 

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1 hour ago, John B said:

You are a fool Wes an absolute fool  and your ilk inhabit a completely different world  which  is completely lacks understanding and reality  which will cause  great hardship to most people in this country - Leaving the EU is a complete  Shitshow

Just look as what is happening after only a few days as described in the Observer by people with experience 

 

 


Ministers must restart trade negotiations with Brussels immediately to sort out the “baffling” array of post-Brexit rules and regulations that now threaten much of the UK’s export trade to the EU, leading business groups have said.

Amid mounting anger among UK firms at cross-border friction they were told would not exist, British manufacturing and trade organisations met Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove in an emergency session on Thursday to discuss problems resulting from the deal struck by Boris Johnson with the EU before Christmas.

The prime minister had hailed what he claimed was a “zero-tariff” and “zero-quotas” deal that would allow free and simple access to the single market. Less than a month on, however, Britain’s EU departure appears to be anything but pain-free.

One leading figure involved in the talks with Gove described the new rule book as a “complete shitshow”. Another said Gove seemed “very concerned” at hearing reports of problems, after a week in which Marks & Spencer was among leading companies to warn that more bureaucracy would increase costs. The source added: “He [Gove] seemed to realise the full gravity of the situation that is unfolding and about to get worse.”


Gove admitted on Friday that there would be “significant additional disruption” at UK borders as a result of Brexit customs changes in the coming weeks.

In the first week after the UK finally left both the single market and customs union, the parcels firm DPD suspended some of its services, bookseller Waterstones halted sales to customers in the EU and UK fishermen warned they would not be able to sell their fresh produce into EU markets because of delays at borders.

There were also problems with consignments between Great Britain and Northern Ireland as new border checks caught many businesses unawares. Luxury food store Fortnum & Mason also told customers on its website: “We are temporarily unable to deliver to Northern Ireland or countries in the European Union”, while Debenhams has temporarily shut its online business in Ireland.

Some of the problems are being blamed on a rushed deal, and others on the sheer complexity of arrangements including “rules of origin”, some of which have not been finally determined. Only goods made up largely of parts that originate in the UK qualify as tariff-free.

Stephen Kelly, chief executive of the Northern Ireland business organisation Manufacturing NI, said: “The reason why the UK and EU originally agreed that there would be an implementation period of 11 months was so that people could get their heads around what was needed and assure their businesses were compliant. But we didn’t have that. We had seven days before everyone had to be ready, and one of those was Christmas Day.

“There is a big problem with GB businesses being unaware of their new responsibilities. We have the triple whammy here of Covid, Christmas and new customs rules arriving all at once without any time to adjust.”

Johnson assured Northern Ireland business owners in November 2019 that they would have “unfettered access” to the rest of the UK. “There will be no forms, no checks, no barriers of any kind,” he said. If anyone told them they needed to fill in forms, “tell them to ring up the PM and I will direct them to throw that form in the bin.”

The government was also facing pressure over its Brexit deal from the SNP. Ian Blackford, the party’s leader in Westminster, called on the UK government to “pay compensation to Scotland”, claiming a “multibillion compensation package” was needed to mitigate the costs of Brexit in Scotland.

Stephen Phipson, chief executive of the manufacturers’ organisation Make UK, said much still needed to be negotiated between the UK and EU. “Industry welcomed the trade agreement that avoided the catastrophe of no-deal, as tariffs and quotas would have been a disaster for exporters. However, this is only a starting point, as there are still substantial issues that need ironing out, with many months, if not years, of tough negotiations ahead.

“There are customs experts with 30 years’ experience who are baffled by what the new regulations mean, let alone small- and medium-sized businesses who have never had to deal with the kind of paperwork that is now required. The great fear is that for many it will prove too much and they will simply choose not to export to the EU.”

He also raised fears about the UK car industry, which could be adversely affected by tariffs if EU rules relating to the origins of components used in car manufacture cannot be met. “Having built up seamless and complex supply chains over decades, the automotive sector in the UK is facing a jolt to its systems that places its very future under threat,” he added. “While there is no suggestion multinationals will close plants overnight, we have already seen decisions to build new models placed elsewhere. As those models that have been built in the UK for many years come to the end of their life, we are likely to see a slow puncture for the sector of investment drifting away.”

Dominic Goudie head of international trade at the Food and Drink Federation said talks needed to re-start between the UK Brussels.

“Where problems emerge there will need to be further conversations,” he said. “The trade deal provides the means to do that. It is a question of whether is the will to do so” (after so many months of talks.”

Sam Lowe, a senior research fellow at the Centre for European Reform, said there were problems that could grow over coming weeks and months.

“The new import/export formalities are proving problematic for many companies. The lack of obvious queues at the border disguises the fact that many trucks are stuck in depots, unable to head to the ports due to their clients failing to provide the necessary documentation and information.”
 


 

Traitor! Get behind the Brexit FFS! 

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On 08/01/2021 at 16:14, Wes Tender said:

or some businesses which had months and months to get their houses in order, haven't bothered to do so.

They had 6 hours.

That was the time gap between the final clarification and publication of the new border protocols and the end of the transition period. We had the opportunity to implement a grace period to allow everyone to get used to the new systems etc, but Johnson flat out refused.

By the time everything has been ironed out, and the new IT system (which is being set up and tested in a real time, live environment) is up and working fully*, many businesses who are dependent on exports to the EU will not survive.

An interesting thread...

 

* - yeah, seriously. Anyone who believes that will be a success clearly hasn't been paying much attention over recent years

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On 09/01/2021 at 20:09, ecuk268 said:

Why didn't Truss answer? The question was clear enough

. As for incompetent politicians, Boris has a cabinet full of them, Williamson probably being the pick of the bunch.

Two more examples for you although the latter is more an example of being a fly by night. The Thatcherites loved the tackiness I’m sure.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/waking-watch-housing-secretary-fire-b1784448.html
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/mar/15/grant-shapps-admits-he-had-second-job-as-millioniare-web-marketer-while-mp

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Missus at Sainsburys this morning and reports that the perishable shelves are absolutely jam-packed with sovereignty.

We actually wanted some Broccoli but I accept this is a metropolitan elitist food so really the people's will that it wasn't there.

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6 hours ago, CB Fry said:

Missus at Sainsburys this morning and reports that the perishable shelves are absolutely jam-packed with sovereignty.

We actually wanted some Broccoli but I accept this is a metropolitan elitist food so really the people's will that it wasn't there.

You should know your rightful place in society and confine yourself to turnips. 

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I have to apologise to all the Remainers on this thread, as I was wrong about the level of disruption that our exit from the EU would cause us. I always believed to EU were infested by a petty minded bunch of bureaucrats, but I can now see that they are only trying to protect the single market and the regulations that protect it.

This was evident by the news story here that amply demonstrates their reasonable approach to trade with our country. 

Brexit: UK driver has ham sandwiches confiscated at Dutch border

 

Dutch sandwiches.jpeg

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58 minutes ago, Guided Missile said:

Why did we ever leave?

Thats certainly what many hauliers are asking. Disproportionate impact on NI, who overwhelmingly voted remain - https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/hauliers-spending-tens-of-thousands-to-bring-empty-lorries-to-northern-ireland-39956472.html

Certainly on your story about sandwiches look like the type of irrelevance it is but then a certain fat blonde bloke made a career out of that sort of thing. Good job as he wasn’t capable of making a career any other way. 

GM - the Sheffield United 2020/21 of the thread

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1 hour ago, Guided Missile said:

I have to apologise to all the Remainers on this thread, as I was wrong about the level of disruption that our exit from the EU would cause us. I always believed to EU were infested by a petty minded bunch of bureaucrats, but I can now see that they are only trying to protect the single market and the regulations that protect it.

This was evident by the news story here that amply demonstrates their reasonable approach to trade with our country. 

Brexit: UK driver has ham sandwiches confiscated at Dutch border

 

Dutch sandwiches.jpeg

Oh, the irony:

Quote

Operation Manna and Operation Chowhound were humanitarian food drops, carried out to relieve a famine in the German-occupied Netherlands, undertaken by Allied bomber crews during the final days of World War II in Europe.

The British operation started first. It was named after the food which was miraculously provided to the Israelites in the Book of Exodus. The planning of the operation was initially done by the Royal Air Force.[3]

The first of the two RAF Avro Lancasters chosen for the test flight, the morning of 29 April 1945, was nicknamed Bad Penny, as in the expression: "a bad penny always turns up".[4] This bomber, with a crew of seven young men (five from Ontario, Canada, including pilot Robert Upcott of Windsor, Ontario), took off in bad weather despite the fact that the Germans had not yet agreed to a ceasefire. (Seyss-Inquart would do so the next day.) Bad Penny had to fly low, down to 50 feet (15 m), over German guns, but succeeded in dropping her cargo and returning to her airfield.

Operation Manna then began in earnest.[5] British aircraft from Groups 1, 3, and 8 took part, flying 145 sorties by Mosquitoes and 3,156 sorties by Lancaster bombers, flying between them a total of 3,301 sorties.

These bombers were used to dropping bombs from 6,000 metres (20,000 ft), but this time they had to do their job from a height of 150 metres (490 ft), some even flying as low as 120 metres (390 ft), as the cargo did not have parachutes.[6] The drop zones, marked by Mosquitoes from 105 and 109 Squadrons using Oboe, were: Katwijk (Valkenburg airfield), The Hague (Duindigt horse race course and Ypenburg airfield), Rotterdam (Waalhaven airfield and Kralingse Plas) and Gouda. Bomber Command delivered a total of 6,680 tons of food.

John Funnell, a navigator on the operation, says the food dropped was tinned food, dried food and chocolate.

As we arrived people had gathered already and were waving flags, making signs, etc., doing whatever they could. It was a marvellous sight. As time went on, so there were also messages, such as Thank you for coming boys. On the 24th April, we were on battle order at Elsham Wolds. We went to a briefing and were told the operation was cancelled because Bomber Harris thought it was too dangerous for the crews. The idea was we would cross the Dutch border at 1,000 feet, and then drop down to 500 feet at 90 knots which was just above stalling speed. On the 29th, we were on battle orders again. There was no truce at that point, and as we crossed the coast, we could see the anti-aircraft guns following us about. We were then meant to rise up to 1,000 feet, but because of the anti-aircraft guns we went down to rooftop level. By the time they sighted on us, we were out of sight. A lot of people were surprised we went without armaments, in case of any trigger-happy tail gunner. Originally, it was going to be 'Operation Spam' which was in my log book. We also went to Lyden, but dropped the food at Falkenburg. We navigators are interested in the latitude and longitude of the place, rather than the name.

The idea was for people to gather and redistribute the food, but some could not resist eating straight away, which caused some people to get sick and vomit, (and some died) a result that fatty food can have in starved bodies known as Refeeding syndrome. On the other hand, distribution sometimes took as long as ten days, resulting in some getting the food only after the liberation. Nevertheless, many lives were saved, and it gave hope and the feeling that the war would soon be over.

 

220px-Operation_Manna_-_Many_Thanks_In_Tulips.jpg

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Pretty sure Ian Duncan Smith said that our free-market buccaneering 21-year olds are now free to dominate the world by taking their ham sandwiches to global markets.

Global. Domination.

Who cares about backwards facing Holland when there are billions to be made in Vietnam and Argentina?

Edited by CB Fry
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I need to hear Truss talking about pork markets again.

But even if you disagree, we as a people voted for these regulations restricting meat and dairy exports, our government created them.

The EU is respecting our sovereignty and imposing our deal.

While sandwiches appears petty, when you delve into the detail behind the Daily Mail outrage, these are the new rules that we asked for and celebrated.

If you want petty, try taking an apple into Australia.

Their country, their rules - as we respectfully say in the UK.

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39 minutes ago, Guided Missile said:

Oh, the irony:

 

220px-Operation_Manna_-_Many_Thanks_In_Tulips.jpg

You truly are pathetic. Are you claiming that the Dutch should be eternally, grovellingly (?), grateful for food drops during 1945. The border officials were enforcing their laws, in exactly the manner that was made obvious in the build up to Dec 31st. You get the same treatment going to New Zealand.

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4 minutes ago, rallyboy said:

 

I need to hear Truss talking about pork markets again.

But even if you disagree, we as a people voted for these regulations restricting meat and dairy exports, our government created them.

The EU is respecting our sovereignty and imposing our deal.

While sandwiches appears petty, when you delve into the detail behind the Daily Mail outrage, these are the new rules that we asked for and celebrated.

If you want petty, try taking an apple into Australia.

Their country, their rules - as we respectfully say in the UK.

Exactly. If anyone is at fault for sandwichgate it's GM.

Edited by badgerx16
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14 minutes ago, rallyboy said:

 

I need to hear Truss talking about pork markets again.

But even if you disagree, we as a people voted for these regulations restricting meat and dairy exports, our government created them.

The EU is respecting our sovereignty and imposing our deal.

While sandwiches appears petty, when you delve into the detail behind the Daily Mail outrage, these are the new rules that we asked for and celebrated.

If you want petty, try taking an apple into Australia.

Their country, their rules - as we respectfully say in the UK.

Sovereign government makes sovereign rules with complete independence and sovereignty.

Other sovereign nations apply those rules and what a surprise it's all Johnny Foreigner's fault.

As anticipated many times: the leavers pretending they want independence and sovereignty but too gutless to ever accept the responsibilities that come with that.

As the old song goes: "Always the victim, it's never your fault."

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3 hours ago, Guided Missile said:

I have to apologise to all the Remainers on this thread, as I was wrong about the level of disruption that our exit from the EU would cause us. I always believed to EU were infested by a petty minded bunch of bureaucrats, but I can now see that they are only trying to protect the single market and the regulations that protect it.

This was evident by the news story here that amply demonstrates their reasonable approach to trade with our country. 

Brexit: UK driver has ham sandwiches confiscated at Dutch border

 

Dutch sandwiches.jpeg

A mere drop in the ocean compared to the famine of biblical proportions, outages of medicines and collapse of trade that was previously predicted to happen in the first week of January ;) 

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16 minutes ago, Weston Super Saint said:

A mere drop in the ocean compared to the famine of biblical proportions, outages of medicines and collapse of trade that was previously predicted to happen in the first week of January ;) 

I must admit, the shortage of medicines was my biggest concern after Brexit. It must be a great relief to the EU that they were able to rely on the advantages of a single market to quickly provide life saving vaccines to their citizens. 

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Fantastic news on Scottish Fish.

Looks like prices on some fish coming out of Peterhead are now 80% cheaper.

This is great news and I guess means that the nation's favourite fish and chips will be cheaper saving money for the great British public and a massive two fingers up to the backward facing  and red-tape obsessed EU.

Yum yum cheaper fish in my tum.

Fantastic Brexit bonus, well done to all concerned.

👍👍👍👍👍👍👍💰💰💰💰💰💰🇬🇧🇬🇧🇬🇧🇬🇧🇬🇧

 

 

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European Medicines Agency Communication from February 2020:

Quote

What is the EU/EEA doing to avoid shortages of medicines after Brexit?
The single market is one of the EU’s major achievements, allowing for seamless trade and supply of products, including medicines, between Member States. The current arrangements for this seamless trade and the supply of medicines between EU Member States and the UK will remain in place until the end of the transition period.
According to EU law, pharmaceutical companies are required to carry out certain essential operations within the EU/EEA to market their medicines in this area. If companies currently carry out some of these essential operations for marketing medicines in the UK, they must transfer them to an EU/EEA Member State before the end of the transition period to comply with EU law and be able to continue supplying the EU/EEA market with their medicines. For example, a UK-based company marketing a medicine in the EU/EEA must formally transfer its licence from the UK company to one that is based in an EU/EEA Member State.
Since May 2017, EU/EEA authorities have given guidance and urged companies to make these changes ahead of Brexit. As a consequence, the risk of disruptions in the supply of some medicines in the EU/EEA has been greatly reduced. 

Der Spiegel - December 2020:

Quote

Such are images of hope: Nurses getting vaccinated. Pallets of packaged vaccines distributed on special flights. Mayors exulting over "the beginning of the end of the pandemic.” A president who is preparing the country for better times. These images are from the United States.

In Germany, on the other hand, you see desolate shopping streets, shuttered restaurants and a government that is preparing its population for long, dark days.

The contrast is unmistakable. On the one hand, there is the supposedly incompetent Trump administration, which will provide vaccines to 20 million Americans in the next two to three weeks alone. By the end of March, the plan is for around 100 million Americans to have received the two vaccine injections they need.

On the other hand, there is the supposedly well-prepared Europeans, who continue to have to wait for a vaccine that was developed in Germany. And who still don’t know exactly how much of the vaccine they will be getting in the coming months. And the late approval of the active ingredient in the BioNTech and Pfizer vaccine by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) appears to be the least of the problems. The bigger issue is that if the situation remains as it is now, there will not be enough vaccine available to get the pandemic under control in Germany before next autumn. The EU appears to have bought too little, too late and at times from the wrong producers. And it appears that it turned down hundreds of millions of vaccine doses that are now lacking.

Dramatic consequences are brewing for the German government: Without being able to vaccinate on a broad scale, the country won’t be able to stop the virus. Which means that the fall and winter of 2021 could be similar to this year, with high infection rates, contact restrictions and lockdowns. The only remedy would be a massive increase in the number of vaccines that are approved for use. But Berlin has made an uncompromising commitment to European solidarity on the vaccination issue. And that means it’s not only the influential and economically strong member states that will have access, but also smaller countries like Romania and Slovenia. If Germany were to go out on its own and buy up vaccine doses that are in short supply, it would massively threaten cohesion in a Europe that is already fragile.

 

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On 28/06/2016 at 15:38, Guided Missile said:
Whitey Grandad said:
Nothing is as straightforward as the Single Market. Anything else costs more.

You just don't have a clue, Whitey. The EU is a regulatory nightmare, one I am just waking up from. Alright if your selling washers, but for anything the Germans and French want to protect, you're f*****

Nostradamus strikes again...

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6 minutes ago, Guided Missile said:

Nostradamus strikes again...

Quote

Why were only 300 million doses of a vaccine secured that had already demonstrated 95 percent efficacy in clinical trials at the time? One that had been hailed as a sensation and was already on its way to regulatory approval? German Health Minister Spahn pushed for more to be purchased, but he failed to prevail in the end due to opposition from several EU member countries -- in part, apparently, because the EU had ordered 300 million doses from the French company Sanofi. "That’s why buying more from a German company wasn't in the cards,” says one insider familiar with the negotiations.

 

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1 hour ago, CB Fry said:

Fantastic news on Scottish Fish.

Looks like prices on some fish coming out of Peterhead are now 80% cheaper.

This is great news and I guess means that the nation's favourite fish and chips will be cheaper saving money for the great British public and a massive two fingers up to the backward facing  and red-tape obsessed EU.

Yum yum cheaper fish in my tum.

Fantastic Brexit bonus, well done to all concerned.

👍👍👍👍👍👍👍💰💰💰💰💰💰🇬🇧🇬🇧🇬🇧🇬🇧🇬🇧

 

 

Price of fish does tend to alter considerably due to a number of factors including the weather, amount of catch etc.
However if the Peterhead catch cant reach European markets then this may well increase the voice of those promoting Scottish Independence. 
Elsewhere the Road Haulage Association is saying that the supply chain into Northern Ireland is close to collapse and even Mr Gove reckons it will get worse before it gets better.
Sinn Fein must be loving that situation.
Apparently we have our 'Sovereignty' back but at what cost, break up of the UK?
Meantime a quote from a haulier in Dover...'The chaos has begun. Organising even the simplest load into Europe has become an almost impossible task due to the mountain of red tape brought in post Brexit'...
This is at a time when traffic between the UK and Europe is approx 25% of peak movements.
Of course there is time for the current mess to be sorted out but if it isn't......???

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43 minutes ago, spyinthesky said:

.
Apparently we have our 'Sovereignty' back but at what cost, break up of the UK?
 

Some on here, and elsewhere, see this as a good thing; solves the Irish Question once and for all, eliminates the Barnett Formula that makes England a nett contributor to the Scottish budget, and leaves the rump as a perceived Tory fiefdom in perpetuity.

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Do you really think a united Ireland would be helpful?
I could see the Unionist kicking up a fuss and blaming the Whitehall Govt and this could lead to more conflict both in Ireland and England.
As for Scottish Independence there is every chance that trying to sort out a deal would create more problems than it solves.
Boris and his supporters wont allow another vote and this will only add to a stronger call for Independence and the prospects of more radical action by certain factions in Scotland.

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25 minutes ago, spyinthesky said:

Do you really think a united Ireland would be helpful?
I could see the Unionist kicking up a fuss and blaming the Whitehall Govt and this could lead to more conflict both in Ireland and England.
As for Scottish Independence there is every chance that trying to sort out a deal would create more problems than it solves.
Boris and his supporters wont allow another vote and this will only add to a stronger call for Independence and the prospects of more radical action by certain factions in Scotland.

Not at all - I said 'Some on here', wasn't including myself. It shouldn't be difficult to find out who does fall into that grouping.

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8 hours ago, Guided Missile said:

I have to apologise to all the Remainers on this thread, as I was wrong about the level of disruption that our exit from the EU would cause us. I always believed to EU were infested by a petty minded bunch of bureaucrats, but I can now see that they are only trying to protect the single market and the regulations that protect it.

This was evident by the news story here that amply demonstrates their reasonable approach to trade with our country. 

Brexit: UK driver has ham sandwiches confiscated at Dutch border

 

Dutch sandwiches.jpeg

You are obviously ignorant, ( duh ! ), of the UK Government advice;

 "Drivers travelling to the EU should be aware of additional restrictions to personal imports.

You cannot bring POAO (products of an animal origin) such as those containing meat or dairy (eg a ham-and-cheese sandwich) into the EU."

Edited by badgerx16
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Truss is doing such a good job, ( https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/55633632 )

While the UK government managed to roll over most of the third-country trade deals it had as part of the EU, that did not include Ghana's.

Labour MP Gareth Thomas told the Commons on Monday: "The government's dismal treatment of Ghana - a key Commonwealth ally - is particularly surprising," criticising the UK negotiators for turning up to talks late and poorly briefed, meaning no deal had been done.

He added the upshot of the failure to do a deal was cocoa, tuna and bananas arriving in the UK faced heavy tariffs (or import taxes), with that already having happened to two shipments.

Last week, the first of those shipments was mentioned in the House of Lords, after it emerged a tariff of £17,500 had been charged at Portsmouth on bananas from Ghana.

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So a bit disappointing that all that money i saved on fish earlier today I have now lost on my new Ford which is going up in price due to the cost implications of the rules of origin rules our sovereign independent government have brought in.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/industry-news/ford-fiesta-st-and-puma-st-prices-rise-“due-brexit”

Still, no downsides, just considerable upside.

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11 minutes ago, CB Fry said:

So a bit disappointing that all that money i saved on fish earlier today I have now lost on my new Ford which is going up in price due to the cost implications of the rules of origin rules our sovereign independent government have brought in.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/industry-news/ford-fiesta-st-and-puma-st-prices-rise-“due-brexit”

Still, no downsides, just considerable upside.

Nobody mentioned British car manufacturers banging on Boris's door - it was all about the Germans haranguing Merkel.

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Meanwhile, a look back at the Guardian from last March. I don't know if I should laugh or cry. Wankers.

Quote

Brexit means coronavirus vaccine will be slower to reach the UK
and it will cost more here because of the UK pulling out of the European Medicines Agency on 30 December
• Three experts explain why Brexit leaves the UK less able to respond to pandemic

Actually, I don't think I'll laugh. The extra deaths caused by the EMA delay in approving the Pfizer vaccine and Macron's pressure to rely on the ineffective Sanofi vaccine is a tragedy. 

Quote

Speaking to German publication, Bild, professor Paul Welfens from Wuppertal University, said the "nonsense" around the approval of the drug will cost around 15,000 lives.”

 

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The UK has already withdrawn from the EU’s emergency bulk-buying mechanism for vaccines and medicines, under which member states strike collective agreements with pharmaceutical companies, which speeds up their access to the latest products during a crisis.

The academics write: “For all these reasons ... the UK is likely to have to join the queue for access with other countries outside the EU, and to pay more than it would otherwise as an EU member state.

Academics...🤣

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