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Remember him from part of the Lowe?Woodward era. Founder of Brazilian soccer schools, treated with distain by the backroom staff and his time here lasted only two months, part of the plan to revolutionise training at Saints

 

Why Woodward's coach had to leave Southampton | Football | The Guardian

Maybe he's now having the last laugh 

How Futsal's 'hothouse laboratory' honed the skills of Arsenal wonderkid Charlie Patino (inews.co.uk)

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4 minutes ago, Badger said:

That links to a Twitter page of Simon Darcy Clifford. 

No wonder he got on well with Rupert.

Would have had the piss taken out of him a lot more if his full name had been known.

Looks like his whole thing with Futsal was right though. It was commented on the other day during a live match about a centre half who was two footed, the commentator said he started off playing futsal which may explain why hes so comfortable on the ball.

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2 hours ago, Turkish said:

Remember him from part of the Lowe?Woodward era. Founder of Brazilian soccer schools, treated with distain by the backroom staff and his time here lasted only two months, part of the plan to revolutionise training at Saints

 

Why Woodward's coach had to leave Southampton | Football | The Guardian

Maybe he's now having the last laugh 

How Futsal's 'hothouse laboratory' honed the skills of Arsenal wonderkid Charlie Patino (inews.co.uk)

For every kid developed by Clifford, they'll be one thousand whose careers have been changed by Dave Bassett and Dennis Wise.

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2 hours ago, The Kraken said:

Clifford had some useful ideas but, my god, the man was a helmet.

Apparently so. He set up the club my lad plays at which is now run by another guy who is also an ex teacher. he’s a decent bloke and big on discipline. 
 

In fairness futsal is brilliant. my son has been going twice a week for about 2 months and has progressed more in that time than in nearly a year at a league 2 academy. Touch, control, passing with both feet and finding space and shooting first time have been transformed. Some of the kids there are really good players. Archie Gray who was on the bench for Leeds the other week at 15 years old went through his club plus my mates son who has just left Bradford. 

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The bloke by all accounts is bit of a bellend but credit where it's due, he was the original one waxing lyrical about futsal/futbol de Salao ( or whatever it was originally called).

The FA had a 3/4 year spell where it really pushed Futsal which recently lost a majority of its funding after COVID. Nationally, grassroots clubs and leagues promote it especially in their foundation phases, as it encourages ball mastery and dominating 1v1's (it's also actually very good at teaching players to steal possession rather than tackle* as you cannot slide). Incredibly good game to help get fit as it's very demanding physically!

Any of you coaching your kids teams, I'd highly recommend looking at using it to support your players, shame the Futsal Level 1 & 2 has been suspended. 

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4 hours ago, LiberalCommunist said:

Another bow to Ruperts legacy.

 

3 hours ago, The Kraken said:

Clifford had some useful ideas but, my god, the man was a helmet.

Think the same could be said of Rupert, the Head Helmet at the time. Bringing Sir Clive and some of his ideas in wasn't as bizarre as it seemed at the time, but the timing of it after relegation when we could ill afford it, and trying to marry 'new' sports science with 'Arry was never going to work.

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  • 9 months later...
On 04/02/2022 at 23:25, Badger said:

 

Think the same could be said of Rupert, the Head Helmet at the time. Bringing Sir Clive and some of his ideas in wasn't as bizarre as it seemed at the time, but the timing of it after relegation when we could ill afford it, and trying to marry 'new' sports science with 'Arry was never going to work.

We were also the first? Football club in England to have an eye gym which has now been used by numerous premier league clubs.

In a lot of ways we were really ahead of the curve at the time but we didn’t have the financial clout or strong leadership for it to actually matter. 

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When Woopert was at the helm he helped steer Garforth to relegation from Northern League Division One to Northern Counties League East.

He then changed tack to concentrate his energies as an MEP for the Reform party and is now looking after his other interests including farming, his electrical business and generally being a pain in the arris.

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1 hour ago, bpsaint said:

Ahhh yes, Simon Clifford, the brains behind the mighty Garforth Town, wonderkid Jason St Juste, and their futsal inspired march into the football league. How is that going these days?.

In fairness, it's not really going to work for players in their 20s and new to it, it's absolutely brilliant for kids though. Some of the things they can do with a ball are night and day to the "get rid of it" when i played at that age where the players who were big and fast did well but anyone else didn't get a look in.

My lad is 9 and has been going for nearly a year now along with 2 other lads from his saturday team plus another has just signed up after his parents saw the difference it's made. The touch, skill, speed of though and movement and awareness they are miles ahead of the rest of the team and lot of other players in the league. It's coming through in results too, last season was their first year playing competitive football and they struggled getting beaten most weeks, sometimes quite heavily, they lost one game this season so far and really should have won that, they've drew 4-4 with a team who hadn't lost in 2 years and who beat them 8-0 last season. The biggest problem we have is that we have a strong 8 or 9 players then 2-3 not so good but if they're all there they have to get a fair amount of game time each regardles of score or ability. I honestly think if those rules weren't in place they'd have won every game so far. 

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2 hours ago, Turkish said:

In fairness, it's not really going to work for players in their 20s and new to it, it's absolutely brilliant for kids though. Some of the things they can do with a ball are night and day to the "get rid of it" when i played at that age where the players who were big and fast did well but anyone else didn't get a look in.

My lad is 9 and has been going for nearly a year now along with 2 other lads from his saturday team plus another has just signed up after his parents saw the difference it's made. The touch, skill, speed of though and movement and awareness they are miles ahead of the rest of the team and lot of other players in the league. It's coming through in results too, last season was their first year playing competitive football and they struggled getting beaten most weeks, sometimes quite heavily, they lost one game this season so far and really should have won that, they've drew 4-4 with a team who hadn't lost in 2 years and who beat them 8-0 last season. The biggest problem we have is that we have a strong 8 or 9 players then 2-3 not so good but if they're all there they have to get a fair amount of game time each regardles of score or ability. I honestly think if those rules weren't in place they'd have won every game so far. 

That's one of the problems with kid's football.

Do you go all out to win and only select the best players or do you give everyone a chance and not get too bothered about results?

When my lad played in the Tyro League, Winsor were the standout side but, no matter how long you'd been with them, if they found someone better you'd be out.

I used to go to all his games and it was interesting to see the difference between different clubs. Sone went all out to win but others just wanted the kids to enjoy themselves even if they weren't that good.

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39 minutes ago, ecuk268 said:

That's one of the problems with kid's football.

Do you go all out to win and only select the best players or do you give everyone a chance and not get too bothered about results?

When my lad played in the Tyro League, Winsor were the standout side but, no matter how long you'd been with them, if they found someone better you'd be out.

I used to go to all his games and it was interesting to see the difference between different clubs. Sone went all out to win but others just wanted the kids to enjoy themselves even if they weren't that good.

The official rule now is at our age groups (under 10s) is that all kids have to get equal game time.  Some clubs don’t enforce it, ours does which means you get kids who aren’t really interested only there because their friends play or parents make them but if they turn up and want to play they have to get equal time regardless of ability. There is one club in the area that hoover up a lot of players and have 3 teams at each age group but they have about 40 registered players and will move them up and down the teams, some don’t even play so a lot of the players and parents are unhappy that whilst they’re a good team with good facilities they don’t have a good club spirit and the players never really bond as they’re constantly moving up and down teams depending on their recent performances. They’ve approached some of ours but they’ve all said they want to stay with us. Ridiculous at the age of 8 and 9.

difficult one and see it from both sides the better players that are super keen get frustrated because they are off the pitch while players no where near as good get their time on but most of the time are just standing around not really that interested in being there, but then you’ve got to let them play if they want to. It’s frustrating,  like the game we lost 2-1, both their goals were scored when 2 of the 3 weaker players were on, then one of them missed an open goal from about a foot out. Everyone was disappointed to lose and some of the better competitive players were very frustrated by it but it is what it is. 
 

Generally we’ve got a really good set up and the parents are supportive, as we do tell the kids and parents that at their age it’s about enjoying it and developing rather than results, but sometimes it’s really frustrating that kids who aren’t really that interested and would rather be in the playground or patting dogs are taking game time from players who love being there and are always first to arrive and last to leave both matches and training 

 

 

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1 hour ago, ecuk268 said:

That's one of the problems with kid's football.

Do you go all out to win and only select the best players or do you give everyone a chance and not get too bothered about results?

When my lad played in the Tyro League, Winsor were the standout side but, no matter how long you'd been with them, if they found someone better you'd be out.

I used to go to all his games and it was interesting to see the difference between different clubs. Sone went all out to win but others just wanted the kids to enjoy themselves even if they weren't that good.

When my son played Tyro they did the equal game time thing until about U13 then stopped because they became one of the best teams and wanted to win stuff.

A couple of kids and their parents got a bit shitty when they didn't get on but they weren't at the same level and in close games it would make the difference when they were on the pitch. They ended up leaving and playing for teams that fitted their level more. 

They weren't ruthless like Windsor and mainly got in better players when others left. They kept the core of the team from U7 onwards and went on to win everything before splitting at the end of the U15 season when the manager quit. Was loads of fun watching the team and the boys progress.

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On 04/02/2022 at 19:49, Turkish said:

Apparently so. He set up the club my lad plays at which is now run by another guy who is also an ex teacher. he’s a decent bloke and big on discipline. 
 

In fairness futsal is brilliant. my son has been going twice a week for about 2 months and has progressed more in that time than in nearly a year at a league 2 academy. Touch, control, passing with both feet and finding space and shooting first time have been transformed. Some of the kids there are really good players. Archie Gray who was on the bench for Leeds the other week at 15 years old went through his club plus my mates son who has just left Bradford. 

Is it too late to send Adams and Armstrong?

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On 24/11/2022 at 12:48, farawaysaint said:

We were also the first? Football club in England to have an eye gym which has now been used by numerous premier league clubs.

In a lot of ways we were really ahead of the curve at the time but we didn’t have the financial clout or strong leadership for it to actually matter. 

Never got off the ground - Redknap poo pooed it as witchcraft Hocus Pocus or some such - the main aspect of it was to widen the periferal vision of the players. The head Wizard Woodward also with a stick in the bubbling Staplewood, had the lady doing it as part of the Rugby World Cup winning team back room staff. 
Can’t recall her name, but heard it mentioned by Gold Medal GB Olympians: and possibly the Lionesses in the Euros preparations 

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