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Ralph Hasenhuttl


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Think we have alot of energy in the side which will suit RabbitHuts high press. The likes of Ings, Redmond, Armstrong, Lemina and Hojbjerg will be a good fit. Hopefully he can get more out of Elyonnoussi too. Will need to score for fun though because we're a shambles at the back

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When the u has an umlaut accent above it, it is a bit tricky to pronounce. Closest sound to it in English is "oo". I was taught that you form your lips as though to say "oo", but then try to say the "ee" sound.

 

Dave Merrington's worst nightmare....!

 

Yes, you OVER pronounce the U.

 

Hass-n-hooo-tle. (the 'ooo' is sounded whilst making your mouth shape like a 'you' sound - hard to describe in text)

 

Happy to be corrected by someone fluent in German though ;)

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Is it me or anyone else worried this getting over the line, say Utd lose at Arsenal and Jose gets the boot, nice little job there, just seems a bit weird with a lot of outlets saying he's signed but officially hasnt and being dragged into a 3rd day, generally if he was happy with deal on table he wouldve signed none of this 'in principle ' hope im wrong but this is what the club has done to me over last 3yrs, just seems he may have irons in other fires, ie Bayern, Roma

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Is it me or anyone else worried this getting over the line, say Utd lose at Arsenal and Jose gets the boot, nice little job there, just seems a bit weird with a lot of outlets saying he's signed but officially hasnt and being dragged into a 3rd day, generally if he was happy with deal on table he wouldve signed none of this 'in principle ' hope im wrong but this is what the club has done to me over last 3yrs, just seems he may have irons in other fires, ie Bayern, Roma

 

I know what you mean, but my theory is releasing it today or yesterday would raise questions as to why he’s not taking control vs Spurs tomorrow. ‘Signing’ on the day would make it more acceptable to not take control that night. But as it’s Saints I do have a similar fear at the back of my mind too!

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Is it me or anyone else worried this getting over the line, say Utd lose at Arsenal and Jose gets the boot, nice little job there, just seems a bit weird with a lot of outlets saying he's signed but officially hasnt and being dragged into a 3rd day, generally if he was happy with deal on table he wouldve signed none of this 'in principle ' hope im wrong but this is what the club has done to me over last 3yrs, just seems he may have irons in other fires, ie Bayern, Roma

 

I think when an esteemed journo like Sam Wallace says it’s going to happen tomorrow I think you can be fairly confident

 

 

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There’s nothing to worry about. Mitchell on the other hand is a lot further from being done.

 

 

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Thanks Ericb. Is it a severance and compensation issue?

 

 

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Is it me or anyone else worried this getting over the line, say Utd lose at Arsenal and Jose gets the boot, nice little job there, just seems a bit weird with a lot of outlets saying he's signed but officially hasnt and being dragged into a 3rd day, generally if he was happy with deal on table he wouldve signed none of this 'in principle ' hope im wrong but this is what the club has done to me over last 3yrs, just seems he may have irons in other fires, ie Bayern, Roma

 

If he had any inkling whatsoever that he was about to be offered the Bayern or Manchester United job then he wouldn't be talking to us at all, and certainly not let it get out that he has agreed in principle to take over.

 

We sacked a manager yesterday, all but announced his replacement (and a bloody good one) within hours of that and STILL we have people on here going into paranoid meltdown and things being "dragged on" to a third day. Dragged on.

 

Jesus wept.

 

Jesus fu cking wept.

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Cheers for the update Eric. Does Mitchell want to come back or does he need convincing to do so?

 

According to the Echo the rumours about Mitchell are not correct stating "it is not an opportunity that is currently being explored"

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According to the Echo the rumours about Mitchell are not correct stating "it is not an opportunity that is currently being explored"

 

I’d imagine if we are interested, we’d be keen to play it down at the moment, especially as just the mention of it yesterday by Wilson got everyone on social media going crazy. Not really our style to tout publicly, and also probably wouldn’t be a good thing for him either.

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Looks like Ross Wilson has been moved across to cover the 'Director of Football Operations' role left vacant by Les then. Leaving 'Director of Scouting and Recruitment' open for Mitchell if he wants it. Ross Wilson has got off very lightly in this restructure given his part in the decline of the past two/three years. The signing of VVD was a nice job but since then that has looked more and more a case of a blind squirrel finding a nut.

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My take on this. I thought it was a strange time to sack Hughes, after a 2-2 draw with Utd, but with all that has happened since the weekend, I am of the opinion, this deal with Hassenhutti, was sorted out last week, maybe the weekend, allowing the Southampton board to get rid of Hughes.

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If he had any inkling whatsoever that he was about to be offered the Bayern or Manchester United job then he wouldn't be talking to us at all, and certainly not let it get out that he has agreed in principle to take over.

 

We sacked a manager yesterday, all but announced his replacement (and a bloody good one) within hours of that and STILL we have people on here going into paranoid meltdown and things being "dragged on" to a third day. Dragged on.

 

Jesus wept.

 

Jesus fu cking wept.

 

After the last few seasons I can't really blame anyone for being sceptical/worried until they see a picture of the guy holding a shirt at SMS on the O/S...

 

 

Satan Laughed

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Indeed, but weren't we told that no one had clue about who to get as they had zero football knowledge....

 

Well if this guardian article is to be believed it looks like Chairman Ralph found an old piece of paper in Les's office titled "Possible Saints Managers 2014 edition" and went with that.

 

Saints, who confirmed the sacking of Mark Hughes on Monday after a dismal run of results, have been aware of Hasenhüttl’s work since his time at Ingolstadt; the Austrian was on their longlist when they appointed Ronald Koeman in June 2014.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/football/2018/dec/04/southampton-ralph-hassenhuttl-new-manager

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I’d imagine if we are interested, we’d be keen to play it down at the moment, especially as just the mention of it yesterday by Wilson got everyone on social media going crazy. Not really our style to tout publicly, and also probably wouldn’t be a good thing for him either.

 

He's in post so it would cost

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I know what you mean, but my theory is releasing it today or yesterday would raise questions as to why he’s not taking control vs Spurs tomorrow. ‘Signing’ on the day would make it more acceptable to not take control that night. But as it’s Saints I do have a similar fear at the back of my mind too!

 

Would anyone give a sh*t if he had been announced yesterday but sat in the stands for spurs? Really? Loads of managers do this.

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Well if this guardian article is to be believed it looks like Chairman Ralph found an old piece of paper in Les's office titled "Possible Saints Managers 2014 edition" and went with that.

 

Saints, who confirmed the sacking of Mark Hughes on Monday after a dismal run of results, have been aware of Hasenhüttl’s work since his time at Ingolstadt; the Austrian was on their longlist when they appointed Ronald Koeman in June 2014.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/football/2018/dec/04/southampton-ralph-hassenhuttl-new-manager

 

Les loved a long list.

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Interesting line, he'll be in charge next season even if we go down.

 

I'm glad in a way, we need to start thinking long-term again. I'm quite confident that we won't go down though.

 

Yeh that is good news, if we go down it won't particularly be his fault (though he still may resign) as the mess is the making of Hughes and Pellegrino, plus the poor recruitment.

 

Cheers for the update Eric. Does Mitchell want to come back or does he need convincing to do so?

 

If he is a genuine target you'd think he probably would need convincing considering Leipzig are 3rd in the Bundesliga, won 5 out of 5 in their Europa League group, they are a club on the up, likely to be in the Champions League next season. We in comparison are not that attractive a proposition, plus the money in the Bundesliga is pretty good.

 

Ralph had no job so was easier to recruit,

 

Looks like Ross Wilson has been moved across to cover the 'Director of Football Operations' role left vacant by Les then. Leaving 'Director of Scouting and Recruitment' open for Mitchell if he wants it. Ross Wilson has got off very lightly in this restructure given his part in the decline of the past two/three years. The signing of VVD was a nice job but since then that has looked more and more a case of a blind squirrel finding a nut.

 

We don't know how much Les over ruled Wilson though, they obviously think he (Les) had too much power as they are not replacing his role, they are likely to spread it out, we might see maybe two people come in to replace him. A third I suppose if they replace Hunter as well.

 

Well if this guardian article is to be believed it looks like Chairman Ralph found an old piece of paper in Les's office titled "Possible Saints Managers 2014 edition" and went with that.

 

Saints, who confirmed the sacking of Mark Hughes on Monday after a dismal run of results, have been aware of Hasenhüttl’s work since his time at Ingolstadt; the Austrian was on their longlist when they appointed Ronald Koeman in June 2014.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/football/2018/dec/04/southampton-ralph-hassenhuttl-new-manager

 

Makes sense though, supposedly we have always had these targets identified, but they are not always available, I mean he was supposedly in for the Bayern job in the summer, so even if we had looked at him instead of Hughes he probably would have said no.

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The main crux of the article:

 

A lot of preparation and careful attention to detail has gone into the training.He breaks down the main aims of his training while at RB Leipzig; the four aspects to their game that they always wanted to get better at – pressing, ball possession, positioning, and what to do when you lose the ball. “Every opposition needs to be played in a different way and the formation depends on the opposition’s strengths. But we trained [mostly] with 4-2-2-2, 4-4-3 and 3-4-3 because we could adapt that for most games.”

 

“Leipzig playing against the ball is famous because of the perfect symmetry in their rows. It is a very intensive way to defend because we have a very high number of players to attack the ball, and [when they win the ball from the opposition] the whole team has to be prepared in where they have to be and how to attack. The team has to be perfectly aligned. The distance between the single players should create triangles and all across the pitch they have the option to pick and choose from these three angles to maybe force the opponent to lose the ball, “ he says. “To learn this takes a lot of automatism and [this] requires the most amount of time in training.”

 

The trademark of his Leipzig, apart from their pace, was their dynamism and the resultant unpredictability. His players were well-drilled in playing between the lines and in the half-spaces between opposition players.

 

“We created different levels when we had the ball, showing the players how and where to position themselves and how the lines need to be. We had a few principles: maximum height, minimum width; over-playing opponents; deep runs to get the ball behind the last line; as little contact, few touches as possible, try for no more than two.

 

“The aim was to capture the ball, switch and quickly advance, in not more than 10 seconds. Of course, it depends on where on the pitch we win the ball. Lots of possibilities. We scored a lot of goals in this manner in their first season. Lots of early and intense pressing.” Then came the second season where more was expected from them because opponents knew how to play against them. “[in the second season] we often got the ball in the middle third or the last third. We needed new strategies. One of the biggest developments was us keeping possession for longer.”

 

In time, they added a fifth aspect to their training programme. Dead balls. He points at the World Cup over the summer and talks about how it showed the relevance of having players adept in dead-ball situations, especially when both teams are evenly matched. “We have small players and sometimes we struggled.” All of this information went into a guidebook prepared by him and his team of trainers. It was updated with new information after every game. Careful, meticulous, intensive; just like Ralph Hasenhuettl.

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Attention to detail, well drilled, meticulous, intensive, preparation, these are words that I would not have used about Hughes, from reports he barely got involved in first team training.

 

A former player who played under Hughes and his coaching team at Blackburn sung his praises and used very similar words to the above when discussing that management team. Perhaps it had changed, perhaps this bunch of players didnt respond? Who knows? Either way, it didnt work out and it looks like we have made a positive change.

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The main crux of the article:

 

A lot of preparation and careful attention to detail has gone into the training.He breaks down the main aims of his training while at RB Leipzig; the four aspects to their game that they always wanted to get better at – pressing, ball possession, positioning, and what to do when you lose the ball. “Every opposition needs to be played in a different way and the formation depends on the opposition’s strengths. But we trained [mostly] with 4-2-2-2, 4-4-3 and 3-4-3 because we could adapt that for most games.”

 

“Leipzig playing against the ball is famous because of the perfect symmetry in their rows. It is a very intensive way to defend because we have a very high number of players to attack the ball, and [when they win the ball from the opposition] the whole team has to be prepared in where they have to be and how to attack. The team has to be perfectly aligned. The distance between the single players should create triangles and all across the pitch they have the option to pick and choose from these three angles to maybe force the opponent to lose the ball, “ he says. “To learn this takes a lot of automatism and [this] requires the most amount of time in training.”

 

The trademark of his Leipzig, apart from their pace, was their dynamism and the resultant unpredictability. His players were well-drilled in playing between the lines and in the half-spaces between opposition players.

 

“We created different levels when we had the ball, showing the players how and where to position themselves and how the lines need to be. We had a few principles: maximum height, minimum width; over-playing opponents; deep runs to get the ball behind the last line; as little contact, few touches as possible, try for no more than two.

 

“The aim was to capture the ball, switch and quickly advance, in not more than 10 seconds. Of course, it depends on where on the pitch we win the ball. Lots of possibilities. We scored a lot of goals in this manner in their first season. Lots of early and intense pressing.” Then came the second season where more was expected from them because opponents knew how to play against them. “[in the second season] we often got the ball in the middle third or the last third. We needed new strategies. One of the biggest developments was us keeping possession for longer.”

 

In time, they added a fifth aspect to their training programme. Dead balls. He points at the World Cup over the summer and talks about how it showed the relevance of having players adept in dead-ball situations, especially when both teams are evenly matched. “We have small players and sometimes we struggled.” All of this information went into a guidebook prepared by him and his team of trainers. It was updated with new information after every game. Careful, meticulous, intensive; just like Ralph Hasenhuettl.

 

Yep, starting to get a feel for why he gets some good results, shhhh don't let the secret out! :suspicious:

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A former player who played under Hughes and his coaching team at Blackburn sung his praises and used very similar words to the above when discussing that management team. Perhaps it had changed, perhaps this bunch of players didnt respond? Who knows? Either way, it didnt work out and it looks like we have made a positive change.

 

Blackburn was 10 years ago, reports and rumours I have seen, both from Saints and Stoke suggest that his input into training is fairly minimal and that training is not very hard.

 

We've already seen Hoedt comment on the lack of defensive training as a team in relation to his Lazio days.

 

He was successful at Blackburn, maybe he just became complacent and standards dropped.

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Blackburn was 10 years ago, reports and rumours I have seen, both from Saints and Stoke suggest that his input into training is fairly minimal and that training is not very hard.

 

We've already seen Hoedt comment on the lack of defensive training as a team in relation to his Lazio days.

 

He was successful at Blackburn, maybe he just became complacent and standards dropped.

 

Agreed, what was considered 'well-organised' ten years ago has been superceded massively now and not sure coaches like Hughes have enough in their locker to compete these days. Pochettino was clearly superb at organising training, but also had a major impact in uniting staff (playing and otherwise) on and off the pitch. Koeman seemed more abrasive; Puel less influential off the pitch; Pellegrino seemed lost. Hasenhuttl clearly from Pochettino's style camp, which bodes well. Looking forward to his impact throughout the club.

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